Archive for August, 2012

San Francisco City Hall Concert Pocket Funk by Jon Hammond Band

August 31, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: San Francisco City Hall Concert Pocket Funk by Jon Hammond Band

http://archive.org/details/SanFranciscoCityHallConcertPocketFunkByJonHammondBand

Youtube http://youtu.be/jcH0VqdDvII

Jon Hammond Band performing in front of San Francisco City Hall original composition “Pocket Funk” with Jon Hammond at his 1965 B3 organ along
with Barry Finnerty guitar, James Preston (of Sons of Champlin Band) drums,
Harvey Wainapel tenor sax, Steve Campos trumpet / flugelhorn
As seen on The Jon Hammond Show cable TV program
http://www.jonhammondband.com
Category:
Music

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/san-francisco-city-hall-concert-pocket-funk-by-jon-hammond-band-6330089

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOCrk0A.x?p=1 width=”960″ height=”568″]

Myspace http://www.myspace.com/video/vid/108956908

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Pocket Funk Louisville Kentucky

http://archive.org/details/PocketFunkInLouisvilleKentucky

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olub20ZlmMI

Jon Hammond Band one night only in Louisville Kentucky
Jon’s tune “Pocket Funk” featuring drummer Ronnie Smith Jr. on this one
Alex Budman tenor sax
John Bishop guitar
Jon Hammond at the organ and bass
*From Jon’s album “Late Rent”
http://www.jonhammondband.com

ENCORES: Louisville Kentucky Jazz Factory – JON HAMMOND Band
Jazzin By Martin Z. Kasdan Jr.
Last year San Francisco-based organist Jon Hammond joined his buddy, Louisville guitarist John Bishop, for a night at the Jazz Factory. Hammond has just released Late Rent, on Ham-Berger-Friz Records, available at http://www.cityhallrecords.com/artist/HAMMOND,%20JON.htm if you can’t find it locally. In an e-mail to me, Hammond described this as “a record that took me 25 years to put together. The disc opens with “Late Rent,” a loping swinger and is followed by “Pocket Funk,” with a slightly Latin feel. “Late Rent” is reprised in a live take at the end of the CD. Lee Morgan’s funky “The Sidewinder” is the only cover tune on the album, although, as Hammond acknowledges in his liner notes, “White Onions” is “a bluesy Hammond/Finnerty composition reminiscent of `Green Onions.'”

In closing, happy holidaze to one and all. You can send greetings to me at mzkjr@yahoo.com

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/pocket-funk-in-louisville-kentucky-6309220

Pat Campbell · Friends with Joe Berger and 16 others
Tear it up Jon !!!!

Loretta Young-Watkins · 2 mutual friends
you go Ron!

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOBi0gA?p=1 width=”320″ height=”270″]

http://vimeo.com/47701235

Pocket Funk in Louisville Kentucky from Jon Hammond on Vimeo.

New York NY — Window of Steinway Hall on W.57th Street
“Secrets of Steinway” pianos –
Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steinway_Hall

Steinway Hall (German: Steinway-Haus) is the name of buildings housing concert halls, showrooms and sales departments for Steinway & Sons pianos. The first Steinway Hall was opened 1866 in New York City.[1] Today, Steinway Halls and Steinway-Häuser are located in world cities such as New York City, London, Berlin and Vienna. A flagship Steinway Hall is on 57th Street in Manhattan in New York City, near Carnegie Hall.

New York NY — Power Corner – Intersection of Central Park South and Fifth Avenue, across from The Plaza Hotel on one corner, Apple Store Fifth Avenue and CBS News Broadcast Center, The Sherry Netherland Hotel

and A LA VIEILLE RUSSIE where people actually buy FABERGE, Antique Jewelry, and Russian Art – Jon Hammond

La Vieille Russie is a New York antiques gallery specializing in European and American antique jewelry, and in Russian works of art. A family business since its establishment in Kiev in 1851, it has been in its present Fifth Avenue location at 781 Fifth Avenue at 59th Street, opposite the southeast corner of Central Park, since 1961. Featured are artworks by Carl Fabergé, created for members of the Romanov court and other wealthy patrons in turn-of-the-century Russia. A La Vieille Russie has bought and sold many of the Fabergé Imperial Easter Eggs…

With the onset of World War II, the gallery relocated from Paris to New York. Initially, it was one of the first tenants at Rockefeller Center in 1934, then moved to another Fifth Avenue location in 1941, and finally to its present location in 1961 on New York’s famed Fifth Avenue, at 59th Street opposite the south entrance of Central Park. — at The Plaza Hotel.

New York NY — 9 West 57th Street, the famous Solow Building – in 1985 this is where I was called to a meeting with then Sony President John O’Donnell in the Sony Corporate offices on the 43rd Floor where he offered me a 7 year contract for my cable TV show “The Jon Hammond Show” to be exclusive on Sony on the new Software Division. At the time the only acts signed to this division on Sony Label were Tina Turner, David Bowie and an experimental project called “Private Dances” – Jon Hammond

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondMNNTVTheJonHammondShow now on MNN TV – 28th year
*Note: Sony vacated the 43rd Floor and moved to the Sony Building. The view from the offices on 43rd Floor were stunning! – JH
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9_West_57th_Street

The Solow Building, located at 9 West 57th Street, is a Manhattan skyscraper designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill’s Gordon Bunshaft and built in 1974. It is located just west of Fifth Avenue, sandwiched between the 57th and 58th Street, next to such prominent buildings as the Bergdorf Goodman department store and the Plaza Hotel. Consisting of 50 stories and 689 ft. (210 m), the building’s only competitor by height in the neighborhood is the GM Building, located one block north and east. Floors above the 23rd floor offer a virtually unobstructed view of northern Manhattan and a complete view of Central Park.
One of the notable aesthetic attributes of the building is the concave vertical slope of its north and south facades, on 57th and 58th Street. This is similar to another of Bunshaft’s creations, the W. R. Grace Building, which is no coincidence, as he had used the initial, rejected façade design for the Solow Building in his design for the Grace Building
The Solow Building features some of the most expensive rents in Manhattan. The Solow Building Company occupies a permanent lease of the top floor of the skyscraper. Well-known tenants include the U.S. Headquarters of the French Corporate and Investment Bank Natixis and private equity firms Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. (42nd fl.), Apollo Management (43rd fl.), Silver Lake Partners (32nd fl.) and Highland Capital Management (38th fl.).
Several law firms and hedge funds occupy a majority of the remainder the space, including Och-Ziff Capital Management (39th fl.) and Highbridge Capital Management (27th fl.). The corporate offices of Chanel (44th fl.), MBNA (50th fl.) and Cendant (Cendant changed its name to Avis Budget Group in 2006) (37th fl.) are also located in the building.
Amenities

The building features an underground parking garage, currently available retail space on the north side bordering 58th Street, an underground space occupied by the Brasserie 8½ restaurant, a 2 floor trading floor on floors 2-3, a newsstand in the lobby, and 24 high-speed elevators subdivided into sets of floors.
[edit]Name Issues

In 1971, Avon Products, Inc. rented 21 floors, quickly expanding to occupy 25 floors, and the building was soon being referred to as “the Avon building” (a moniker that persists and can still cause confusion nearly 40 years later). In 1975, the building’s owner, Sheldon Solow, sued Avon for misappropriating the building’s trademark without compensation. Although Avon moved out of the building in 1997, in May 2005 the lawsuit finally went to trial and was subsequently dismissed two months later.[3]
[edit]In popular culture

“The Red 9” in front of the Solow Building
The large red sculpture of the digit 9 in front of the building was included in the project as a response to the complaints that the building’s sloping reflecting walls revealed unappealing sides of the neighboring historic buildings that were previously obscured. The brightly colored sculpture was to distract the eyes of passersby from noticing these walls. This famous New York sculpture was designed by graphic artist Ivan Chermayeff.
The restaurant Brasserie 8½ was featured on the show Sex and the City.
Chandler Bing a character from the sitcom Friends worked in this building during the series.
Namesake of the Nine West shoe store chain.
In Superman, a jewel thief is apprehended by Superman while scaling the side of the building while wearing suction cups on his hands and knees[4].
Featured in the film Zoolander with a giant computer generated M, which served as Mugatu’s fashion headquarters.
In the film Cloverfield, the monster’s hand slides down the facade of the building when knocked down momentarily by a carpet bombing run.
In the film Lost in America, the final scene where Albert Brooks’ character David Howard meets advertising executive Brad (“This little town car…Will drive you away…”) occurs in front of this building.
Was featured in the film Bride Wars behind the “Plaza Hotel”. — at 9 West 57th.

New York NY — Artist Yayoi Kusama looking at the people looking at her in window of Louis Vuitton on Fifth Avenue and 57th St. today – Jon Hammond
http://www.yayoi-kusama.jp/e/information/index.html
(草間 彌生 or 草間 弥生, Kusama Yayoi, born March 22, 1929)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yayoi_Kusama

s a Japanese artist and writer. Throughout her career she has worked in a wide variety of mediums, including painting, collage, sculpture, performance art and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition and pattern. A precursor of the pop art, minimalist and feminist art movements, Kusama influenced contemporaries such as Andy Warhol and Claes Oldenburg.[1] Although largely forgotten after departing the New York art scene in the early 1970s, Kusama is now acknowledged as one of the most important living artists to come out of Japan, and an important voice of the avant-garde.
Born in Matsumoto, Nagano into an upper middle-class family of seedling merchants,[2] Kusama started creating art at an early age, going on to study Nihonga painting in Kyoto in 1948. Frustrated with this distinctly Japanese style, she became interested in the European and American avant-garde, staging several solo exhibitions of her paintings in Matsumoto and Tokyo during the 1950s. In 1957 she moved to the United States, settling down in New York City where she produced a series of paintings influenced by the abstract expressionist movement. Switching to sculpture and installation as her primary mediums, Kusama became a fixture of the New York avant-garde, having her works exhibited alongside the likes of Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg and George Segal during the early 1960s, where she became associated with the pop art movement. Embracing the rise of the hippie counterculture of the late 1960s, Kusama came to public attention after she organised a series of Body Festivals in which naked participants were painted with brightly colored polka dots.
In 1973, Kusama moved back to her native Japan, where she found the art scene far more conservative than that in New York. Becoming an art dealer, her business folded after several years, and after experiencing psychiatric problems, in 1977 she voluntarily admitted herself to a hospital, where she has spent the rest of her life. From here, she continued to produce artworks in a variety of mediums, as well as launching a literary career by publishing several novels, a poetry collection and an autobiography.
Kusama’s work is based in conceptual art and shows some attributes of feminism, minimalism, surrealism, Art Brut, pop art, and abstract expressionism, and is infused with autobiographical, psychological, and sexual content. Kusama is also a published novelist and poet, and has created notable work in film and fashion design. Major retrospectives of her work have been held at the Museum of Modern Art and Tate Modern, whilst in 2008 Christies New York sold a work by her for $5.1 million, a record for a living female artist
Born in Matsumoto, Nagano Prefecture as the fourth child in a prosperous and conservative family,[4] whose wealth was derived from the management of wholesale seed nurseries,[5] Kusama has experienced hallucinations and severe obsessive thoughts since childhood, often of a suicidal nature. She claims that as a small child she suffered severe physical abuse by her mother.[6] In 1948, she left home to enter senior class at Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, where she studied Nihonga painting, a rigorous formal style developed during the Meiji period; she graduated the following year.[7] She hated the rigidities of the master-disciple system where students were supposed to imbibe tradition through the sensei. “When I think of my life in Kyoto,” she is quoted, “I feel like vomiting.”[8]
[edit]Early success in Japan: 1950–1956
By 1950, Kusama was depicting abstracted natural forms in watercolor, gouache and oil, primarily on paper. She began covering surfaces (walls, floors, canvases, and later, household objects and naked assistants) with the polka dots that would become a trademark of her work. The vast fields of polka dots, or “infinity nets,” as she called them, were taken directly from her hallucinations. The earliest recorded work in which she incorporated these dots was a drawing in 1939 at age 10, in which the image of a Japanese woman in a kimono, presumed to be the artist’s mother, is covered and obliterated by spots.[9] Her first series of large-scale, sometimes more than 30 ft-long canvas paintings,[10] Infinity Nets, were entirely covered in a sequence of nets and dots that alluded to hallucinatory visions. In the early 1960s Kusama began to cover items such as ladders, shoes and chairs with white phallic protrusions.[11] Despite the micromanaged intricacy of the drawings, she turned them out fast and in bulk, establishing a rhythm of productivity she still maintains. She established other habits too, like having herself routinely photographed with new work.[12]
Since 1963, Kusama has continued her series of Mirror/Infinity rooms. In these complex installations, purpose-built rooms lined with mirrored glass contain scores of neon coloured balls, hanging at various heights above the viewer. Standing inside on a small platform, light is repeatedly reflected off the mirrored surfaces to create the illusion of a never-ending space.[13]
[edit]New York City: 1957–1972
After living in Tokyo and France, Kusama left Japan at the age of 27 for the United States. In 1957 she moved to Seattle, where she stayed for a year[14] before moving on to New York City, following correspondence with Georgia O’Keeffe in which she became interested in joining the limelight in the city.[15] During her time in the U.S., she quickly established her reputation as a leader in the avant-garde movement. In 1961 she moved her studio into the same building as Donald Judd and sculptor Eva Hesse; Hesse became a close friend. During the following years, she was enormously productive, and by 1966, she was experimenting with room-size, freestanding installations that incorporated mirrors, lights, and piped-in music. She counted Judd and Joseph Cornell among her friends and supporters. However, she did not profit financially from her work. Around this time, Kusama was hospitalised regularly from overwork, and O’Keeffe convinced her own dealer Edith Herbert to purchase several works in order to help Kusama stave off financial hardship.[16]
Kusama organized outlandish happenings in conspicuous spots like Central Park and the Brooklyn Bridge, often involving nudity and designed to protest the Vietnam War. In one, she wrote an open letter to Richard Nixon offering to have sex with him if he would stop the Vietnam war.[17] Between 1967 and 1969 she concentrated on performances held with the maximum publicity, usually involving Kusama painting polka dots on her naked performers, as in the Grand Orgy to Awaken the Dead at the MOMA (1969), which took place at the Sculpture Garden of the Museum of Modern Art.[18] In 1968, Kusama presided over the happening Homosexual Wedding at the Church of Self-obliteration in 33 Walker Street in New York, and performed alongside Fleetwood Mac and Country Joe and the Fish at the Fillmore East, New York City.[19] She opened naked painting studios and a gay social club called the Kusama ’Omophile Kompany (kok).[20]
In 1966, Kusama first participated in the 33rd Venice Biennale. Her Narcissus Garden comprised hundreds of mirrored spheres outdoors in what she called a ‘kinetic carpet’. As soon as the piece was installed on a lawn outside the Italian pavilion, Kusama, dressed in a golden kimono,[21] began selling each individual sphere for 1,200 lire ($2), until the Biennale organisers put an end to her enterprise. Perhaps one of Kusama’s most notorious works, Narcissus Garden was as much about the promotion of the artist through the media as it was an opportunity to offer a critique of the mechanisation and commodification of the art market. Various versions of Narcissus Garden have been presented worldwide venues including Le Consortium, Dijon, 2000; Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2003; as part of the Whitney Biennial in Central Park, New York in 2004; and at the Jardin de Tuileries in Paris, 2010.[22]
During her time in New York, Kusama had a decade-long sexless relationship with the American artist Joseph Cornell, Kusama’s only recorded romantic attachment to date.
[edit]Return to Japan: 1973–present

Yayoi Kusama’s Ascension of Polka Dots on the Trees at the Singapore Biennale 2006 on Orchard Road, Singapore.
In 1973, Kusama returned to Japan in ill health, where she began writing shockingly visceral and surrealistic novels, short stories, and poetry. Kusama checked herself into the Seiwa Hospital for the Mentally Ill and eventually took up permanent residence. She has been living at the hospital since, by choice. Her studio, where she has continued to produce work since the mid-1970s, is a short distance from the hospital in Shinjuku, Tokyo.[23] Kusama is often quoted as saying: “If it were not for art, I would have killed myself a long time ago.”[24] She continued to paint, but now in high-colored acrylics on canvas, on an amped-up scale.[25]
Yayoi Kusama said about her 1954 painting titled Flower (D.S.P.S),
One day I was looking at the red flower patterns of the tablecloth on a table, and when I looked up I saw the same pattern covering the ceiling, the windows and the walls, and finally all over the room, my body and the universe. I felt as if I had begun to self-obliterate, to revolve in the infinity of endless time and the absoluteness of space, and be reduced to nothingness. As I realized it was actually happening and not just in my imagination, I was frightened. I knew I had to run away lest I should be deprived of my life by the spell of the red flowers. I ran desperately up the stairs. The steps below me began to fall apart and I fell down the stairs straining my ankle.[citation needed]
Another quote of hers:
“…a polka-dot has the form of the sun, which is a symbol of the energy of the whole world and our living life, and also the form of the moon, which is calm. Round, soft, colorful, senseless and unknowing. Polka-dots become movement… Polka dots are a way to infinity.”[26]
Her organically abstract paintings of one or two colors (the Infinity Nets series), which she began upon arriving in New York, garnered comparisons to the work of Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Barnett Newman. When she left New York she was practically forgotten as an artist until the late 1980s and 1990s, when a number of retrospectives revived international interest.[27] Following the success of the Japanese pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1993 – a dazzling mirrored room filled with small pumpkin sculptures in which she resided in color-coordinated magician’s attire – Kusama went on to produce a huge, yellow pumpkin sculpture covered with an optical pattern of black spots. The pumpkin came to represent for her a kind of alter-ego or self-portrait.[28] Kusama’s later installation I’m Here, but Nothing, (2000–2008) is a simply furnished room consisting of table and chairs, place settings and bottles, armchairs and rugs, however its walls are tattooed with hundreds of fluorescent polka dots glowing in the UV light. The result is an endless infinite space where the self and everything in the room is obliterated.[29] The multi-part floating work Guidepost to the New Space, a series of rounded “humps” in fire-engine red with white polka dots, was displayed in Pandanus Lake.
[edit]Works

[edit]Writing
In 1977, Kusama published a book of poems and paintings entitled 7. One year later, her first novel Manhattan Suicide Addict appeared. Between 1983 and 1990, she finished the novels The Hustler’s Grotto of Christopher Street (1983), The Burning of St Mark’s Church (1985), Between Heaven and Earth (1988), Woodstock Phallus Cutter (1988), Aching Chandelier (1989), Double Suicide at Sakuragazuka (1989), and Angels in Cape Cod (1990), alongside several issues of the magazine S&M Sniper in collaboration with photographer Nobuyoshi Araki.[30]
[edit]Film
In 1968, the film “Kusama’s Self-Obliteration” which Kusama produced and starred in won a prize at the Fourth International Experimental Film Competition in Belgium and the Second Maryland Film Festival and the second prize at the Ann Arbor Film Festival. In 1991, Kusama starred in the film Tokyo Decadence, written and directed by Ryu Murakami, and in 1993, she collaborated with British musician Peter Gabriel on an installation in Yokohama.[31]

Red Pumpkin (2006), Naoshima
[edit]Fashion
In 1968, Kusama established Kusama Fashion Company Ltd., and began selling avantgarde fashion in the “Kusama Corner” at Bloomingdales.[32] In 2009, Kusama designed a handbag-shaped cell phone called C-top, and My Doggie Ring-Ring, an accompanying dog-shaped holder, for a limited edition of Japan’s mobile communication giant KDDI Corporation’s “iida“ brand.[33] In 2011, Kusama created artwork for six limited-edition lipglosses from Lancôme.[34] That same year, she worked with Marc Jacobs (who visited her studio in Japan in 2006) on a line of Louis Vuitton products, including leather goods, ready-to-wear, accessories, shoes, watches, and jewelry.[35]
[edit]Commissions

Narcissus Garden (2009), Instituto Inhotim
To date, Kusama has completed several major outdoor sculptural commissions, mostly in the form of brightly hued monstrous plants and flowers, for public and private institutions including Pumpkin (1994) for the Fukuoka Municipal Museum of Art; The Visionary Flowers (2002) for the Matsumoto City Museum of Art; Tsumari in Bloom (2003) for Matsudai Station, Niigata; Tulipes de Shangri-La (2003) for Euralille in Lille, France; Pumpkin (2006) at Bunka-mura on Benesse Island of Naoshima; Hello, Anyang with Love (2007) for Pyeonghwa Park, Anyang; and The Hymn of Life: Tulips (2007) for the Beverly Gardens Park in Los Angeles.[36] In 1998, she realized a mural for the hallway of the Gare do Oriente subway station in Lisbon. Alongside these monumental works, she has produced smaller scale outdoor pieces including Key-Chan and Ryu-Chan, a pair of dotted dogs. All the outdoor works are cast in highly durable fiberglass-reinforced plastic, then painted in urethane to glossy perfection.[37]
In 2010, Kusama designed a Town Sneaker-model bus, which she titled Mizutama Ranbu (Wild Polka Dot Dance) and whose route travels through her home town of Matsumoto.[38] In 2011, she was commissioned to design the front cover of millions of pocket London Underground maps; the result is entitled Polka Dots Festival in London (2011). Coinciding with an exhibition of the artist’s work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2012, a 120-foot reproduction of Kusama’s painting Yellow Trees (1994) covered a condominium building under construction in New York’s Meatpacking District.[39] That same year, Kusama conceived her floor installation Thousands of Eyes as a commission for the new Queen Elizabeth II Courts of Law, Brisbane.[40]
[edit]Exhibitions

Repetitive Vision (1996) installation at Mattress Factory Art Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
In 1959, Kusama had her first solo exhibition in New York at the Brata Gallery, an artist’s co-op. She showed a series of white net paintings which were enthusiastically reviewed by Donald Judd (both Judd and Frank Stella then acquired paintings from the show).[41] Kusama has since exhibited work with, among others, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, and Jasper Johns. Exhibiting alongside European artists including Lucio Fontana, Pol Bury, Otto Piene, and Gunther Uecker, in 1962 she was the only female artist to take part in the widely acclaimed ‘Nul’ (Zero) international group exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.[42] She represented Japan at the Venice Biennale in 1993, and in 1998–1999 a major retrospective exhibition of her work toured the U.S. and Japan. Major exhibitions of her work include Kitakyushu Municipal Museum of Art, Fukuoka, Japan (1987); Center for International Contemporary Arts, New York (1989); “Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama,1958–1969”, LACMA, 1998 (traveling to Museum of Modern Art, New York, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo), 1998–99; Le Consortium, Dijon, 2000 (traveled to Maison de la Culture du Japon, Paris; Kunsthallen Brandts, Odense, Denmark; Les Abattoirs, Toulouse; Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna; and Artsonje Center, Seoul, 2001–2003); “KUSAMATRIX”, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, 2004 (traveling to Art Park Museum of Contemporary Art, Sapporo Art Park, Hokkaido); “Eternity – Modernity”, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (touring Japan), 2004–2005; and “The Mirrored Years”, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, 2008 (traveling to Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand, 2009). In August 2010, Kusama exhibited at the Aichi Triennale 2010 [1], Nagoya. Her works are exhibited inside the Aichi Arts Center, out of the center and Toyota car polka dot project. As of July 2011, several of Kusama’s most intimate works are on display at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid, Spain.
As part of FINA Festival 2007, Kusama created Guidepost to the New Space, a vibrant outdoor installation for Birrarung Marr beside the Yarra River in Melbourne. In 2009, the Guideposts were re-installed at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, this time displayed as floating “humps” on a lake.[43]
An exhibition of Kusama’a work opened at the Tate Modern in London on February 9, 2012.[44] Described as ‘akin to being suspended in a beautiful cosmos gazing at infinite worlds, or like a tiny dot of fluoresecent plankton in an ocean of glowing microscopic life’,[45] the exhibition features work from Kusama’s entire career.
[edit]Collections

Kusama’s work is in the collections of leading museums throughout the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Tate Modern, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.
[edit]Recognition

Yayoi Kusama’s retrospective exhibition at Tate Modern, London in early 2012.
Kusama has received numerous awards, including the Asahi Prize (2001); Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (2003); and the National Lifetime Achievement Awards, the Order of the Rising Sun (2006). In October 2006, Yayoi Kusama became the first Japanese woman to receive the Praemium Imperiale, one of Japan’s most prestigious prizes for internationally recognized artists.[46]
[edit]Art market

Kusama’s work has performed strongly at auction: top prices for her work are for paintings from the late 1950s and early 1960s. As of 2012, her work has the highest turnover of any living woman artist.[47] In November 2008, Christie’s New York sold a 1959 white “Infinity Net” painting formerly owned by Donald Judd,[48] No. 2, for $5.1 million, then a record for a living female artist.[49] In comparison, the highest price for a sculpture from her New York years is £72,500 ($147,687), fetched by the 1965 wool, pasta, paint and hanger assemblage Golden Macaroni Jacket at Sotheby’s London in October 2007. A 2006 acrylic on fiberglass-reinforced plastic pumpkin earned $264,000, the top price for one of her sculptures, also at Sotheby’s in 2007[50]
In the 1960s, Beatrice Perry’s Gres Gallery played an important role in establishing Kusama’s career in the United States. Ota Fine Arts, Kusama’s longtime Tokyo dealer, has worked with the artist since the 1980s.[51] Since 2007, Kusama is also represented by Gagosian Gallery and Victoria Miro Gallery; before moving to Gagosian, she had been with Robert Miller Gallery, New York.[52]
[edit]In popular culture

Superchunk, an American indie band, included a song called “Art Class (Song for Yayoi Kusama)” on its Here’s to Shutting Up album.
Yoko Ono cites Kusama as an influence.
The recently built Matsumoto Performing Art Center in her hometown Matsumoto, designed by Toyo Ito, has an entirely dotted façade, likely influenced by her works.[original research?]
She is mentioned in the lyrics of the Le Tigre song Hot Topic.
[edit]Bibliography

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Net: The Autobiogrphy of Yayoi Kusama, 2011, English, Translated by Ralph McCarthy, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A., ISBN 978-0-226-46498-5.
Jo Applin, “Resisting Infinity”, Yayoi Kusama, exch. cat., Victoria Miro Gallery, London, 2008
Izumi Nakajima, “Yayoi Kusama between Abstraction and Pathology”. In: Griselda Pollock (ed.), Psychoanalysis and the Image. London: Routledge, 2006.
“Collection of Print Works: Yayoi Kusama, 1974–2004”, Japanese/English, Abe Corporation, Tokyo Japan.
“Eternity-Modernity: Yayoi Kusama”, 2005, English/Japanese, Bijutsu Shuppan-sha Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
“Manhattan Suicide Addict: Yayoi Kusama”, 2005, French, Les Presses du Reel, Dijon, France.
“Kusamatrix”, 2004, English/Japanese, Kadokawa Shoten, Tokyo.
“Yayoi Kusama Furniture by graf: decorative mode no.3”, 2003, Seigensha Art Publishing, Inc, Kyoto, Japan.
“Yayoi Kusama”, 2003, German, Kunsthalle wien, Vienna, Austria.
“Infinity Nets”, 2002, Japanese, Sakuhinsha, Tokyo, Japan.
“Yayoi Kusama”, 2001, French, Les Press du Reel Janvier, Dijon, France.
“Yayoi Kusama”, 2000, English, Phaidon Press Ltd, London, UK.
“Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958–1968”, Los Angeles County Museum of Art 1998, Lynn Zelevansky, Laura Hoptman, Yayoi Kusama
“Violet Obsession”, 1998, English, Wandering Mind Books, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
“Hustlers Grotto”, 1998, English, Wandering Mind Books, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
J. F. Rodenbeck, “Yayoi Kusama: Surface, Stitch, Skin”. In: Catherine de Zegher (ed.), Inside the Visible. The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston & MIT Press, 1996.
“Yayoi Kusama Print Works”, 1992, Abe Corporation, Tokyo, Japan.
“Yayoi Kusama: Driving Image”, 1986, Parco shuppan, Tokyo, Japan.
“A Book of Poems and Paintings”, 1977, Japan Edition Art, Tokyo, Japan.
Judy B. Cutler, “Narcissus, Narcosis, Neurosis: The Visions of Yayoi Kusama”. In: Hirsh, Jennie, and Wallace, Isabelle D., eds. Contemporary Art and Classical Myth. Farnham: Ashgate, 2011 — with Yayoi Kusama at Louis Vuitton NA.

pocket funk, louisville kentucky, organ jazz, jon hammond, yayoi kusama, loui vuitton, 9 west 57th street, La Vieille Russie, Radio TV Show

san francisco, city hall, pocket funk, b3 organ, late rent session men, jon hammond, local 6, musicians union, ascap, blues, jazz

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In Memory of George Brown and Jon’s Journal August 30, 2012

August 30, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: In Memory of George Brown

http://archive.org/details/InMemoryOfGeorgeBrownJazzDrummerDiedParisFrance

Youtube http://youtu.be/s3M5N6LitVY

Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men with the late great jazz drummer George Brown in performance at Hot Brass Club in Paris France just 2 days before Jon’s group did a live broadcast on Radio France Inter hosted by M. André Francis Producteur Jazz Radio grande – George Brown drums, Barry Finnerty guitar, Jon Hammond organ and special guest Didier Lockwood violin. Special thanks to Francoise Pujol.
Note: George often would say “See you in a minute” and those who knew him remember him daily by using that phrase often.
Rest in peace George, see you in a minute,
Jon Hammond http://www.jonhammondband.com
Category Music

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/in-memory-of-george-brown-jazz-drummer-died-paris-france-6326750

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOClEIC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Lydia’s Tune in Shoreline Amphitheatre Keys To Happiness

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondLydia_sTuneJonHammondandTheLateRentSessionMeninShorelineAmphitheatre

Keys To Happiness – Jon Hammond Excelsior Accordions

Youtube http://youtu.be/570UApnn_cQ

Lydia’s Tune – Jon Hammond plays one on the Excelsior accordion with The Late Rent Session Men – Barry Finnerty guitar, Larry Schneider tenor saxophone and James Preston from Sons of Champlin band drums in Shoreline Amphitheatre at the 12th annual New Orleans by The Bay Food and Music Festival put on by Bill Graham Presents
Keys to Happiness Excelsior Accordions
http://www.accordionradio.com
Category:
Music

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Jon Hammond San Francisco City Hall Concert Hip Hop Chitlins

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondSanFranciscoCityHallConcertHipHopChitlins

Youtube http://youtu.be/SaVA_gA5IXo

Jon Hammond Band performing in front of San Francisco City Hall original composition “Hip Hop Chitlins” with Jon Hammond at his 1965 B3 organ along
with Barry Finnerty guitar, James Preston (of Sons of Champlin Band) drums,
Harvey Wainapel tenor sax, Steve Campos trumpet / flugelhorn
As seen on The Jon Hammond Show cable TV program
http://www.jonhammondband.com

http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/jon-hammond-san-francisco-city-hall-concert-hip-hop-chitlins-6327938

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOCnWYC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/lydia-s-tune-jon-hammond-and-the-late-rent-session-men-in-shoreline-amphitheatre-6324501

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOCgnkC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

Hip Hop Chitlins – Vimeo http://vimeo.com/48273820

Hip Hop Chitlins and Late Rent Theme Song in Shoreline Amphitheatre from Jon Hammond on Vimeo.

Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men playing original compositions
“Hip Hop Chitlins” and “Late Rent” Jon Hammond’s theme song in Shoreline Amphitheatre for the 12th annual New Orleans by The Bay Food and Music Festival produced by Bill Graham Presents. On the band with Jon are Larry Schneider tenor saxophone, Barry Finnerty guitar, James Preston drums
Jon Hammond at the B3 organ and bass
special thanks Mick Brigden
http://www.jonhammondband.com

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Pocket Funk Jon Hammond in Shoreline Amphitheatre New Orleans by The Bay

http://archive.org/details/PocketFunkJonHammondInShorelineAmphitheatreNewOrleansByTheBay

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/pocket-funk-jon-hammond-in-shoreline-amphitheatre-new-orleans-by-the-bay-6324482

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOCgmYC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

Youtube http://youtu.be/lf-eIpXVXqY

Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men laying down some serious Pocket Funk at the 12th annual New Orleans by The Bay Food and Music Festival for Bill Graham Presents. Original Jon Hammond composition from Jon’s album “Late Rent” with James Preston drums from Sons of Champlin band, Larry Schneider tenor saxophone, Barry Finnerty guitar and Jon Hammond at his 1965 Hammond B3 organ
Special thanks Mick Brigden and the BGP Team
http://www.jonhammondband.com

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Jazz Concert de Trio Film Françoise Pujol sur France Inter

http://archive.org/details/JazzConcertDeTrioFilmFranoisePujolSurFranceInter

Youtube http://youtu.be/VeyIbZy6mok

Ce film historique de Françoise Pujol Trio en concert à l’intérieur de la radio France Inter est la première fois qu’un appareil a été autorisé à filmer à l’intérieur de ce studio de radio. L’homme caméra n’est autre que Jon Hammond. Un merci très spécial à André Francis Producteur Jazz Radio grande!
This marks the 20th anniversary of this wonderful concert, yes it was 20 years ago folks! Incredible playing by these musicians – Francoise Pujol who is my personal favorite pianist in France today – Jazz and Classical. Along with her emerging star musicians: Bassist Richard Bona the phenom bass player born in Cameroon and now living in Brooklyn, and the very tasteful drumming (and sometimes explosive!) of Francis Lassus of Paris.
S’il vous plaît profiter de cette radio France Inter concert présenté par Jon Hammond.
Les gens l’attention de New York: Françoise Pujol et sa bande seront en provenance de Paris pour jouer 2 concerts le 8 Septembre et le 10, je suis honoré d’être un invité spécial lors d’une partie de son concert d’orgue Hammond avec Françoise et sa bande. Nous espérons vous y voir! Pour plus d’informations:
http://www.HammondCast.com
FaceBook http://www.facebook.com/hammondcast

New York NY — Trombonist Art Baron soloing with Harlem Blues & Jazz Band last Saturday night at ZEB’s on W.28th Street – shown are Michael Max Fleming bass, Jackie Williams drums and Bill Wurtzel guitar looking on – Jon Hammond — at ZEB’s

Moscow Russia — This was our view outside the window of our 10th floor room in the Rossiya Hotel when I went to Moscow to play 2 concerts 9 years ago in trio with tenor saxophonist Igor Butman and Eduard Zizak drums – and special guests – Youtube http://youtu.be/-34rP08PwrY
11,921
HAMMOND & BUTMAN-BLUES IN THE MOSCOW WHITE NIGHTS
Organist JON HAMMOND in concert with saxophonist IGOR BUTMAN, ALEXEI KUZNETZOV (gtr.), VLADIMIR DANILIN (accordion) & EDUARD ZIZAK (drums) togehter for the first time in MOSCOW RUSSIA at LE CLUB in THEATRE TAGANKA *JENNIFER-Camera, *Special Thanks: FAINA COBHAM *Official Site: http://www.HammondCast.com/ *STORY: http://community.webtv.net/GoldenPenMan/BLUESINTHEMOSCOW — at Таганка

Hamburg Germany — The Analog to Digital Transfer Room at NDR Radio Studios – Jon Hammond
The NDR Sessions Projekt – Behind The Beat
http://behindthebeat.com/2006/05/jon-hammond-the-ndr-sessions-projekt/
Jon Hammond’s “The NDR Sessions Projekt” brings the soulful jazz organist back to Hamburg to record a collection of standards and originals featuring Lutz Buchner on saxophones, Joe Gallardo on trombone and Heinz Lichius on drums. Recorded in one of Germany’s best studios, the quartet present rich, heartfelt perfomances and infuse the music with a fresh and vibrant sound.
NDR Sessions
Jon Hammond says the NDR session was based on a sentimental idea.
Lutz Buchner
Jon Hammond wanted to feature saxophonist Lutz Buchner on the CD.
Bass and Organ
Jon Hammond says his style is playing bass and organ – on the Hammond.
Jazz Spirits
Jon Hammond wanted to rekindle a certain jazz spirit – and take some risks.
Label: Ham-Berger-Friz Records
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norddeutscher_Rundfunk
Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) (North German Broadcasting) is a public radio and television broadcaster, based in Hamburg. In addition to the city-state of Hamburg, NDR transmits for the German states of Lower Saxony, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Schleswig-Holstein. NDR is a member of the ARD consortium.
NDR studios

NDR television buildings in Hamburg
Studios in Hamburg are split into two locations, both of them within the borough of Eimsbüttel: Television studios are located in the quarter of Lokstedt as the radio studios are located in the quarter of Rotherbaum, a little closer to the city centre. In addition to these, there are further regional studios, also comprising both television and radio facilities. They are located in the state capitals Hanover, Kiel and Schwerin as well as at the ARD’s national studios in Berlin. The NDR also maintains other regional offices within its four state territories.

New York NY — Tenor Saxophonist Fred Staton on the gig last night with Harlem Blues and Jazz Band at ZEB’s on W.28th St. – Fred is looking sharp and playing fantastic, senior member of the band at 97 years old! – Jon Hammond — at ZEB’s

george brown, jazz drummer, paris, hot brass, organ, funky, blues, new york city

Lydia’s Tune Jon Hammond Accordion and Journal August 28, 2012

August 28, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Lydia’s Tune in Shoreline Amphitheatre Keys To Happiness

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondLydia_sTuneJonHammondandTheLateRentSessionMeninShorelineAmphitheatre

Keys To Happiness – Jon Hammond Excelsior Accordions

Youtube http://youtu.be/570UApnn_cQ

Lydia’s Tune – Jon Hammond plays one on the Excelsior accordion with The Late Rent Session Men – Barry Finnerty guitar, Larry Schneider tenor saxophone and James Preston from Sons of Champlin band drums in Shoreline Amphitheatre at the 12th annual New Orleans by The Bay Food and Music Festival put on by Bill Graham Presents
Keys to Happiness Excelsior Accordions
http://www.accordionradio.com
Category:
Music

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/lydia-s-tune-jon-hammond-and-the-late-rent-session-men-in-shoreline-amphitheatre-6324501

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOCgnkC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

Hip Hop Chitlins – Vimeo http://vimeo.com/48273820

Hip Hop Chitlins and Late Rent Theme Song in Shoreline Amphitheatre from Jon Hammond on Vimeo.

Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men playing original compositions
“Hip Hop Chitlins” and “Late Rent” Jon Hammond’s theme song in Shoreline Amphitheatre for the 12th annual New Orleans by The Bay Food and Music Festival produced by Bill Graham Presents. On the band with Jon are Larry Schneider tenor saxophone, Barry Finnerty guitar, James Preston drums
Jon Hammond at the B3 organ and bass
special thanks Mick Brigden
http://www.jonhammondband.com

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Pocket Funk Jon Hammond in Shoreline Amphitheatre New Orleans by The Bay

http://archive.org/details/PocketFunkJonHammondInShorelineAmphitheatreNewOrleansByTheBay

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/pocket-funk-jon-hammond-in-shoreline-amphitheatre-new-orleans-by-the-bay-6324482

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOCgmYC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

Youtube http://youtu.be/lf-eIpXVXqY

Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men laying down some serious Pocket Funk at the 12th annual New Orleans by The Bay Food and Music Festival for Bill Graham Presents. Original Jon Hammond composition from Jon’s album “Late Rent” with James Preston drums from Sons of Champlin band, Larry Schneider tenor saxophone, Barry Finnerty guitar and Jon Hammond at his 1965 Hammond B3 organ
Special thanks Mick Brigden and the BGP Team
http://www.jonhammondband.com

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Jazz Concert de Trio Film Françoise Pujol sur France Inter

http://archive.org/details/JazzConcertDeTrioFilmFranoisePujolSurFranceInter

Youtube http://youtu.be/VeyIbZy6mok

Ce film historique de Françoise Pujol Trio en concert à l’intérieur de la radio France Inter est la première fois qu’un appareil a été autorisé à filmer à l’intérieur de ce studio de radio. L’homme caméra n’est autre que Jon Hammond. Un merci très spécial à André Francis Producteur Jazz Radio grande!
This marks the 20th anniversary of this wonderful concert, yes it was 20 years ago folks! Incredible playing by these musicians – Francoise Pujol who is my personal favorite pianist in France today – Jazz and Classical. Along with her emerging star musicians: Bassist Richard Bona the phenom bass player born in Cameroon and now living in Brooklyn, and the very tasteful drumming (and sometimes explosive!) of Francis Lassus of Paris.
S’il vous plaît profiter de cette radio France Inter concert présenté par Jon Hammond.
Les gens l’attention de New York: Françoise Pujol et sa bande seront en provenance de Paris pour jouer 2 concerts le 8 Septembre et le 10, je suis honoré d’être un invité spécial lors d’une partie de son concert d’orgue Hammond avec Françoise et sa bande. Nous espérons vous y voir! Pour plus d’informations:
http://www.HammondCast.com
FaceBook http://www.facebook.com/hammondcast

New York NY — Trombonist Art Baron soloing with Harlem Blues & Jazz Band last Saturday night at ZEB’s on W.28th Street – shown are Michael Max Fleming bass, Jackie Williams drums and Bill Wurtzel guitar looking on – Jon Hammond — at ZEB’s

Moscow Russia — This was our view outside the window of our 10th floor room in the Rossiya Hotel when I went to Moscow to play 2 concerts 9 years ago in trio with tenor saxophonist Igor Butman and Eduard Zizak drums – and special guests – Youtube http://youtu.be/-34rP08PwrY
11,921
HAMMOND & BUTMAN-BLUES IN THE MOSCOW WHITE NIGHTS
Organist JON HAMMOND in concert with saxophonist IGOR BUTMAN, ALEXEI KUZNETZOV (gtr.), VLADIMIR DANILIN (accordion) & EDUARD ZIZAK (drums) togehter for the first time in MOSCOW RUSSIA at LE CLUB in THEATRE TAGANKA *JENNIFER-Camera, *Special Thanks: FAINA COBHAM *Official Site: http://www.HammondCast.com/ *STORY: http://community.webtv.net/GoldenPenMan/BLUESINTHEMOSCOW — at Таганка

Hamburg Germany — The Analog to Digital Transfer Room at NDR Radio Studios – Jon Hammond
The NDR Sessions Projekt – Behind The Beat
http://behindthebeat.com/2006/05/jon-hammond-the-ndr-sessions-projekt/
Jon Hammond’s “The NDR Sessions Projekt” brings the soulful jazz organist back to Hamburg to record a collection of standards and originals featuring Lutz Buchner on saxophones, Joe Gallardo on trombone and Heinz Lichius on drums. Recorded in one of Germany’s best studios, the quartet present rich, heartfelt perfomances and infuse the music with a fresh and vibrant sound.
NDR Sessions
Jon Hammond says the NDR session was based on a sentimental idea.
Lutz Buchner
Jon Hammond wanted to feature saxophonist Lutz Buchner on the CD.
Bass and Organ
Jon Hammond says his style is playing bass and organ – on the Hammond.
Jazz Spirits
Jon Hammond wanted to rekindle a certain jazz spirit – and take some risks.
Label: Ham-Berger-Friz Records
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norddeutscher_Rundfunk
Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) (North German Broadcasting) is a public radio and television broadcaster, based in Hamburg. In addition to the city-state of Hamburg, NDR transmits for the German states of Lower Saxony, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Schleswig-Holstein. NDR is a member of the ARD consortium.
NDR studios

NDR television buildings in Hamburg
Studios in Hamburg are split into two locations, both of them within the borough of Eimsbüttel: Television studios are located in the quarter of Lokstedt as the radio studios are located in the quarter of Rotherbaum, a little closer to the city centre. In addition to these, there are further regional studios, also comprising both television and radio facilities. They are located in the state capitals Hanover, Kiel and Schwerin as well as at the ARD’s national studios in Berlin. The NDR also maintains other regional offices within its four state territories.

New York NY — Tenor Saxophonist Fred Staton on the gig last night with Harlem Blues and Jazz Band at ZEB’s on W.28th St. – Fred is looking sharp and playing fantastic, senior member of the band at 97 years old! – Jon Hammond — at ZEB’s

New York NY — “Meat Without Feet” van sighted – Jon Hammond

New York NY — One of the greatest jazz guitarists – Tal Farlow onstage at Zanzibar and Grill playing his signature Tal Farlow model guitar made for him by Gibson Guitars circa year 1990 – 550 Third Avenue, between 36th and 37th Streets – Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tal_Farlow
Talmage Holt Farlow (June 7, 1921 – July 25, 1998) was an American jazz guitarist. Nicknamed the “Octopus”, for his extremely large hands spread over the fretboard as if they were tentacles, he is considered one of the all-time great jazz guitarists. Where other similar players of his day combined rhythmic chords with linear melodies, Farlow preferred placing single notes together in clusters, varying between harmonically richened tones based on a startling new technique.
Biography

Farlow was born in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1921. Nearly as famous for his reluctance to perform publicly as for his outstanding abilities, he did not take up the instrument until he was 21, but within a year was playing professionally and in 1948 was with Marjorie Hyams’ band. While with the Red Norvo Trio from 1949–1953, Farlow became famous in the jazz world. His huge hands and ability to play rapid yet light lines, which earned him the nickname “Octopus”, made him one of the top guitarists of the era. After six months with Artie Shaw’s Gramercy Five in 1953, Farlow put together his own group, which for a time included pianist Eddie Costa.
In 1958, Farlow retired from full-time performing and settled in Sea Bright, New Jersey, returning to a career as a sign painter. He continued to play occasional dates in local clubs, however.[1] In 1962 the Gibson Guitar Corporation, with Farlow’s participation, produced the “Tal Farlow” model in their prestigious Artist Model line. The guitar seen in the picture at right is a prototype model. The production model has a mandolin-style scroll at the top of the body.
Farlow only made one record as a leader during 1960–1975, but emerged a bit more often during 1976–1984, recording for Concord fairly regularly before largely disappearing again. He was profiled in the documentary film, Talmage Farlow, made in 1980/81. The guitarist can be heard on his records for Blue Note (a 10″ LP in 1954), Norgran (later Verve, 1954–60), and Prestige (1969), aa well those for Concord. He died of cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City on July 25, 1998 at the age of 77.[2]
[edit]Discography

The Tal Farlow Quartet (1954; Blue Note)
The Tal Farlow Album (1954; Norgran)
The Artistry of Tal Farlow (1955; Norgran)
The Interpretations of Tal Farlow (1955; Norgran)
A Recital by Tal Farlow (1955; Norgran)
Swing Guitars (1955; Norgran)
Poppin’ and Burnin’ (1955; Verve)
Guitar Player (1974; Prestige)
Tal (1956; Norgran)
Fuerst Set (1956; Xanadu Records)
Second Set (1956; Xanadu)
Metronome All-Stars, 1956 Verve MGV 8030
The Swinging Guitar of Tal Farlow (1957; Verve)
This is Tal Farlow (1958; Verve)
The Guitar Artistry of Tal Farlow (1960; Verve)
Tal Farlow Plays the Music of Harold Arlen (1960; Verve)
The Return of Tal Farlow (1969; Prestige Records)
Trinity (1976; CBS Sony)
A Sign of the Times (1977; Concord)
Tal Farlow ’78 (1978; Concord)
On Stage (1981; Concord)
Chromatic Palette (1981; Concord)
Cookin’ on all Burners (1983; Concord)
The Legendary Tal Farlow (1985; Concord)
All Strings Attached (1987; JazzVisions)
Standards Recital (1993; FD Music)
Project G-5: A Tribute to Wes Montgomery (1993; Evidence Records)
Jazz Masters 41 Tal Farlow (1995; Verve)
Tal Farlow (1996; Giants of Jazz)
Chance Meeting (1997; Guitarchives Tal Farlow & Lenny Breau – Music from the Soundtrack of Talmage Farlow.)
Live at the Public Theatre (2000; Productions A-Propos The Tal Farlow Trio (with Tommy Flanagan & Red Mitchell – Music from the Soundtrack of Talmage Farlow.)
Tal Farlow’s Finest Hour (2001; Verve)
Tal’s Blues (2002; Past Perfect)
Two Guys with Guitars (2004; Frozen Sky Records)
The Complete Verve Tal Farlow Sessions (2004; Mosaic) — at 550 Third Avenue New York NY

shoreline amphitheatre, maison du radio, paris concert, new orleans by the bay, jon hammond, francoise pujol, organ, b3, piano, accordion, excelsior, jazz, m. andre francis

Radio France Inter Concert de Jazz Jon Hammond Journal August 24, 2012

August 24, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Jazz Concert de Trio Film Françoise Pujol sur France Inter

http://archive.org/details/JazzConcertDeTrioFilmFranoisePujolSurFranceInter

Youtube http://youtu.be/VeyIbZy6mok

Ce film historique de Françoise Pujol Trio en concert à l’intérieur de la radio France Inter est la première fois qu’un appareil a été autorisé à filmer à l’intérieur de ce studio de radio. L’homme caméra n’est autre que Jon Hammond. Un merci très spécial à André Francis Producteur Jazz Radio grande!
This marks the 20th anniversary of this wonderful concert, yes it was 20 years ago folks! Incredible playing by these musicians – Francoise Pujol who is my personal favorite pianist in France today – Jazz and Classical. Along with her emerging star musicians: Bassist Richard Bona the phenom bass player born in Cameroon and now living in Brooklyn, and the very tasteful drumming (and sometimes explosive!) of Francis Lassus of Paris.
S’il vous plaît profiter de cette radio France Inter concert présenté par Jon Hammond.
Les gens l’attention de New York: Françoise Pujol et sa bande seront en provenance de Paris pour jouer 2 concerts le 8 Septembre et le 10, je suis honoré d’être un invité spécial lors d’une partie de son concert d’orgue Hammond avec Françoise et sa bande. Nous espérons vous y voir! Pour plus d’informations:
http://www.HammondCast.com
FaceBook http://www.facebook.com/hammondcast
Category:
Music

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/jazz-concert-de-trio-film-fran%C3%A7oise-pujol-sur-france-inter-6319218

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOB2VYC.x?p=1 width=”720″ height=”433″]

ANDRE FRANCIS, MONSIEUR JAZZ
http://www.franceculture.fr/emission-mythologie-de-poche-de-la-radio-andre-francis-monsieur-jazz-2011-08-23

Il y a un peu plus d’un an, dans Les Passagers de la nuit, on pouvait entendre Les Mythologies de poche de la radio, petits et grands dialogues autour des archives et considérations radiophoniques… Nous vous proposons cet été 25 nouvelles Mythologies de poche de la radio pour donner à entendre la radio et ceux qui la font.
Nous recevons aujourd’hui André Francis, homme de radio, producteur et programmateur de concerts et de festivals.
50 ans de jazz, et plus encore. André Francis commence à parler de jazz à St Germain des prés, quelque temps après la Libération, au Club d’Essai de la Radiodiffusion. Il ne cessera jamais, même après sa retraite. On l’entend ce soir, en pleine forme, et dans ses archives, parfois en compagnie de Boris Vian lui-même. Et on apprendra aussi comment André Francis a fait changer ses propositions sur les ondes, selon les évolutions du jazz : free, cool, hard bop… On finit l’émission par un morceau d’anthologie enregistré en 1964 par André Francis et son équipe à Juan-les-Pins en plein air, où Ella Fitzgerald a maille à partir avec un criquet !

La grande Histoire du jazz (5/5) avec André Francis
André Francis, qui a été pendant plusieurs décennies le “Monsieur Jazz” de Radio France (sur France Inter et France Musique), occupe intelligemment sa retraite : il vient de concocter en 100 CD (125 heures d’écoute…) une “Grande Histoire du Jazz” couvrant le premier demi-siècle de cette musique.
Publiée en 4 coffrets de 25 CD couvrant chacun une période cohérente de l’histoire du jazz, cette “encyclopédie” s’avère passionnante par la pertinence subjective de ses choix et les textes qui les accompagnent.

Pour l’occasion, André Francis est invité à passer cette semaine de fête avec nous pour commenter lui-même ses choix au micro d’Open Jazz.

Une ballade amoureuse autour de quelques chefs d’œuvres du jazz.

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Indigo Blues

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondAndBernardPurdieTakingYouBackToYear1989IndigoBlues

Youtube http://youtu.be/sSP3k6XVYwE

As seen on the long-running NYC cable TV show The Jon Hammond Show –
Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men December 12, 1989
In Indigo Blues Club which was partly owned by Miles Davis at the time.
Downstairs in The Hotel Edison 221 West 46th Street New York City
Here on Jon’s band kicking it off are
Alex Foster tenor saxophone
Jack Wilkins guitar
Bernard Purdie drums
Jon Hammond at the B3 Organ
Camera by Joe Berger
http://www.HammondCast.com
Category:
Music

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/jon-hammond-and-bernard-purdie-taking-you-back-to-year-1989-indigo-blues-6318645

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOB1RkA.x?p=1 width=”960″ height=”568″]

indigo blues, late rent session men, bernard purdie, b3 organ, drums, miles davis, local 802 musicians union, hotel edison, cable tv show, jazz, 1989

Anaheim California — Serious NAMM Action with Jon Hammond and Joe Berger – standing L to R Jon Hammond,
Joe Berger and Lawrence “Larry” Gay Producer of West Coast Live Radio Program with serious camera – seated on couch Carroll Brothers Tambuzi “Tam” Carroll and Tom Carroll both trumpet players — with Joe Berger at The NAMM Show

Merci Beaucoup George Whitman Shakespeare and Company bookstore in Paris December 12, 1913 – December 14, 2011 from Jon Hammond

12/15/2011 New York, NY — R.I.P. George Whitman founder of Shakespeare & Co. Book Shop in Paris, I shot this photo of George’s best friend Lawrence Ferlinghetti the Poet in front of George’s shop when I met him and Lawrence on my first journey to Paris 1981. The child is George’s daughter Sylvia, she is grown up now and runs the shop, she will carry on for George there in St. Michel Paris – Jon Hammond *note: thanks / merci beaucoup for all the great Sunday teas 4PM-6PM I attended at your apartment when I was living in Paris George! JH

Photo by Jon Hammond – Lawrence Ferlinghetti and young Sylvia Whitman in front of Shakespeare & Company book shop in St. Michel Paris with umbrella, photo by Jon Hammond circa 1981:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Whitman

Whitman founded his bookstore in 1951 and named it Le Mistral, then later named it after Sylvia Beach’s earlier Paris bookstore “Shakespeare and Company”.[3] His shop, located at 37 rue de la Bûcherie in Paris, was opened in August 1951 (two years before a sister bookshop City Lights was opened in San Francisco by Lawrence Ferlinghetti) by George Whitman with an inheritance from his aunt. He called the shop “Le Mistral” after his first French girlfriend. From the very first night he allowed travellers, young writers, poets and artists to lodge in exchange for a hand in cleaning the shop, building shelves and selling books. Sylvia Beach, whose famous shop was on 12, rue de l’Odéon, was still in Paris and came to Le Mistral to see the writers of the new generation, whom Anaïs Nin called Xerox artists,[citation needed] read aloud their new work. Whitman modeled his shop after Sylvia Beach’s. As it was the only free English-language lending library in Paris, the Beats who arrived at the Beat Hotel on rue Git-le-Coeur quickly found their way to the small bookshop and made a place for themselves there. In 1962, Sylvia Beach died, willing to Whitman a good deal of her private books and the rights to the name Shakespeare and Company. In 1964, Le Mistral was renamed Shakespeare and Company. Whitman named his daughter, born in 1981, after his bibliophilic predecessor; Sylvia Whitman took over the running of the shop in 2003 at age 22.[4]
Whitman allowed young travellers to stay in the residential quarters of his rue de la Bûcherie premises (specifically published writers); and one was also encouraged to read a book a day during your stay and were asked for two hours work as contribution to the running of the shop. All Whitman asked of his guests is to provide a short “biography” and photograph and work a short period in the shop. On Sunday mornings he traditionally cooked his guests a pancake breakfast, brewing up a thin ersatz “syrup” out of some burnt sugar and water.
Whitman began to receive international notice when a documentary titled Portrait of a Bookstore as an Old Man, by Gonzague Pichelin and Benjamin Sutherland, ran on The Sundance Channel in fall 2005. At the end of the film, Whitman trimmed his hair using the flame of a candle, set his hair on fire, and then doused it.
On Wednesday, September 26, 2007, journalist Gerry Hadden’s story on George Whitman, his daughter Sylvia, and Shakespeare & Company aired on NPR’s The World (a co-production of the BBC, Public Radio International (PRI), and the Boston radio station WGBH).[5][6]
[edit]Death

Whitman died on December 14, 2011, at age 98, at home in the apartment above his bookshop, Shakespeare and Company, in Paris. He will be buried in the Père Lachaise cemetery in the east of Paris.


*WATCH THE VIDEO OF OLIVER HERE:

http://ia600406.us.archive.org/11/items/JonHammondOliverJohnsonbatterie-Finale/OliverJohnsonLastSong.m4v

http://www.archive.org/details/JonHammondOliverJohnsonbatterie-Finale

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Priceless Al Jazzbo Collins Movie by Jon Hammond

http://archive.org/details/AlJazzboCollinsHornAndHardartCnnBroadcastByJonHammond

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NwfEsLvmTw

As seen on The Jon Hammond Show MCTV MNN TV cable access show with the classic opening by famous Weather Man Lloyd Lindsay Young and CNN live radio broadcast extravaganza AM 1130 WNEW All Star Show Hosted by the late great Al Jazzbo Collins aka Jazzbeaux Collins
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_%22Jazzbo%22_Collins
covered by Jon Hammond personally on May 29, 1987
Radio Hall of Fame http://www.bayarearadio.org/audio/jazzbeaux/
Incredible dialogue between Al Jazzbo Collins and Cynthia Tornquist of CNN she learns a lot from Jazzbeaux about the Purple Grotteaux and the night world of Jazz Musicians and the special people in the Al’s world. Whether Cynthia knows it or not she is being majooberized!
Jazzbo leads the famous call and response based on the 1948 film The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. In one scene some obviously very bad banditos try to pass themselves off to Bogart as federales (police). Humphrey Bogart’s character knows they are not federales but nevertheless asks to see some badges. The bandito-in-charge responds “Badges?! I don’t got no badges. We don’t need no badges! I don’t have to show you any stinkin’ badge.”
Most special broadcast and painting of the manhole cover door to Purple Grotteaux seen world wide on CNN TV as shot by Jon Hammond personally, enjoy folks!
*Note: The phone number for BackBeat Productions running on this clip was taken over by the IRS Internal Revenue Servie after a long battle with Jon Hammond, they had a bank of numbers 340-9000, 9001 etc. so they really wanted 212-340-9007 they finally got it. If you call it now you’ll get the IRS not Jon Hammond folks! Special thanks Lew Anderson big band, Lew was Clarabell the Clown on Howdy Doody TV Show between 1954 and 1960 his music playing while Jon Hammond takes you on a tour of the food of Horn & Hardart Automat at corner of 42nd St. and Third Avenue in Manhattan just below the main studios of WNEW Radio, now 1130 is Bloomberg Radio. For more information http://www.HammondCast.com Jon Hammond Show is still on the air 28th year MNNTV in New York City

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/al-jazzbo-collins-horn-and-hardart-cnn-broadcast-by-jon-hammond-5727732

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYLdzFgC?p=1 width=”596″ height=”334″]

Jon Hammond Coverage of Jimmy Wormworth 75-Ain’t-No-Jive Birthday Party in Metropolitan Room New York City

New York NY — George Braith apparently checking his SMS text messages while James Zollar takes a few smokin’ choruses! George is one of the rare veteran jazz musicians who embrace technology, great work cats! Neal Miner is rock solid on the basso profundo…someone tell me the drummer’s name? Exellent! Incredible music throughout Jimmy Wormworth’s birthday celebration yesterday 75-Ain’t-No-Jive in NYC’s Metropolitan Room – Jon Hammond — with George Braith, Neal Miner and James Zollar at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — I loved this part of the party for Jimmy Wormworth birthday party 75-Ain’t-No-Jive, most amazing Tabla drums player who I believe is Jimmy’s Dentist and his guitarist, really beautiful music! Jon Hammond — at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — One of the incredible high points of Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive Birthday party yesterday, Priscilla led everyone in very strong soulful voice in Stevie Wonder’s version of Happy Birthday to Jimmy & Nico! God bless Professor Priscilla doing god’s working teaching the elementary school classes in Brooklyn NYC! Some really great singers in the house, wow..that was very moving! Jon Hammond — with Mary Worm, Russell Jackson, Jimmy Wormworth and Tracy Wormworth at The Metropolitan Room

Tracy Wormworth Thanks so much Jon, for the beautiful commentary and pictures, and for attending the party!!!

Jon Hammond Many thanks Tracy! Best time I’ve had in a long time, your Dad is so cool and beloved by so many cool people – he is a shining beacon of inspiration and your Family is really beautiful! God bless, c u soon again hopefully, Jon

New York NY — Howard Brofsky blew everybody away when he played yesterday at Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive birthday party! I heard Howard tell Jimmy before he played, “This is for you Jimmy!” bravo Professor Howard Brofsky!!! – Jon Hammond
http://www.vtjazz.org/faculty/2008/12/howard-brofsky.html
Dr. Brofsky has enjoyed a long and distinguished career in Jazz Education as well as in 18th-century Italian music
. His numerous accomplishments include Fulbright grants to study and teach in France (where he made his first jazz recording) and Italy.

He spent the fall of 1993 teaching jazz history to university students in Oslo, Norway and is the author of the definitive music appreciation text, “The Art of Listening.”

A regular with Larry Rivers and the Climax Band in New York, he has played with Jimmy Heath, Donald Byrd, Dexter Gordon, and other Jazz Greats. He has a recent CD entitled “73 down: drbebop,” with among others, Attila Zoller, Jimmy Heath, and Larry Willis.

Brofsky is also Professor Emeritus of Music at Queens College, NY.
— at The Metropolitan Room. — at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — Main man Rudy Sheriff Lawless kicked it off on the cans with George Braith yesterday at Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive birthday party, fantastic and dynamic as always Rudy! Jon Hammond — at The Metropolitan Room.

Jon Hammond tumblr tumblin’ on a beautiful Monday folks! http://hammondcast.tumblr.com/ , enjoy! Jon

New York NY — Trumpeter James Zollar sounded fantastic with these fine rhythm section musicians, Neal Miner bass – please someone drummer’s name? at Jimmy Wormworth’s incredible birthday party last night! – Jon Hammond — with James Zollar at The Metropolitan Room

Auster Bar Hamburg Jon Hammond Band
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-NEkNftUz4
Auster Bar Jazz Bar Michael Leuschner Presents Jon Hammond Band

One Night Only on the Henriettenweg Hamburg, very cool scene!
Jon Hammond original composition “Lydia’s Tune” with Michael Leuschner flugelhorn, Heinz Lichius drums,
Joe Berger guitar, Jon Hammond at Sk1 Hammond organ and bass — at Auster Bar

Andre Francis, Radio France Inter, Jazz, Concert, Paris, Richard Bona, Jon Hammond, Ivry sur Seine, Orgue, 20 years, anniversary, cable TV show

Indigo Blues Jon Hammond Journal August 23, 2012

August 23, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Indigo Blues

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondAndBernardPurdieTakingYouBackToYear1989IndigoBlues

Youtube http://youtu.be/sSP3k6XVYwE

As seen on the long-running NYC cable TV show The Jon Hammond Show –
Jon Hammond and The Late Rent Session Men December 12, 1989
In Indigo Blues Club which was partly owned by Miles Davis at the time.
Downstairs in The Hotel Edison 221 West 46th Street New York City
Here on Jon’s band kicking it off are
Alex Foster tenor saxophone
Jack Wilkins guitar
Bernard Purdie drums
Jon Hammond at the B3 Organ
Camera by Joe Berger
http://www.HammondCast.com
Category:
Music

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/jon-hammond-and-bernard-purdie-taking-you-back-to-year-1989-indigo-blues-6318645

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOB1RkA.x?p=1 width=”960″ height=”568″]

indigo blues, late rent session men, bernard purdie, b3 organ, drums, miles davis, local 802 musicians union, hotel edison, cable tv show, jazz, 1989

Anaheim California — Serious NAMM Action with Jon Hammond and Joe Berger – standing L to R Jon Hammond,
Joe Berger and Lawrence “Larry” Gay Producer of West Coast Live Radio Program with serious camera – seated on couch Carroll Brothers Tambuzi “Tam” Carroll and Tom Carroll both trumpet players — with Joe Berger at The NAMM Show

New York NY — One of the greatest jazz guitarists – Tal Farlow onstage at Zanzibar and Grill playing his signature Tal Farlow model guitar made for him by Gibson Guitars circa year 1990 – 550 Third Avenue, between 36th and 37th Streets – Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tal_Farlow
Talmage Holt Farlow (June 7, 1921 – July 25, 1998) was an American jazz guitarist. Nicknamed the “Octopus”, for his extremely large hands spread over the fretboard as if they were tentacles, he is considered one of the all-time great jazz guitarists. Where other similar players of his day combined rhythmic chords with linear melodies, Farlow preferred placing single notes together in clusters, varying between harmonically richened tones based on a startling new technique.

New York NY — King of TV & Radio Joe Franklin Living Legend of Broadcasting! Jon Hammond
Seen here in his office “Memory Lane” with Broadcast Tape Masters etc.
Youtube http://youtu.be/b_-mYcrxtTo
8,819
Radio & TV Broadcasting Legend JOE FRANKLIN in an appearance at NYC’s Laugh Factory Club at annual Thanksgiving Feed shot personally by Mr. Hammond. This is hilarious rare footage of Joe doing stand-up, a must see!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Franklin
Joe Franklin (born Joseph Fortgang on March 9, 1926) is an American radio and television personality. From New York City, Franklin is credited with hosting the first television talk show. The show began in 1951 on WJZ-TV (later WABC-TV) and moved to WOR-TV (later WWOR-TV) from 1962 to 1993.[1]
After retiring from the television show, Franklin concentrated on an overnight radio show, playing old records on WOR-AM on Saturday evenings. He currently interviews celebrities on the Bloomberg Radio Network.[2]
An author, Franklin has written 23 books, including Classics of the Silent Screen.[3] His 1995 autobiography Up Late with Joe Franklin[4] chronicles his long career and includes claims that he had dalliances with Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, and that Veronica Lake “threw herself at me, but I always refrained.”[5] He has appeared as himself in countless films, notably Ghostbusters and Broadway Danny Rose.
Franklin’s show was often parodied by Billy Crystal during the 1984–1985 season of Saturday Night Live. Franklin was also a pioneer in promoting products such as Hoffman Beverages and Ginger Ale on the air.

Frankfurt Germany — Jon Hammond receives the awesome flowers from Musikmesse Projekt Team!
Flowers and Cake (Chocolate on Chocolate)
Youtube http://youtu.be/hozrJpHvV-4
Musikmesse Warm Up Party in Jazzkeller Frankfurt with Jon Hammond Band and special guests for this special occasion celebrating 25 years in Musikmesse. Special acknowledgement of Wilhelm P. “Charly” Hosenseidl R.I.P. who was the Director of Musikmesse years 1989-2008 now Directed by Wolfgang Luecke, special thanks to Messe Frankfurt Projekt and Presse Team!
Jon Hammond Band:
Joe Berger guitar
Tony Lakatos tenor saxophone
Giovanni Gulino drums
Jon Hammond – XB-2 Hammond Organ – special thanks Hiromitsu Ono Chief Engineer Suzuki Musical Instruments designed my instrument which took me all around the world many times
“Late Rent” Jon Hammond theme song for Jon Hammond Show MNNTV and HammondCast Show KYOU Radio San Francisco CBS Radio Network
Thanks Joe Lamond President CEO NAMM, TecAmp Jürgen Kunze and Thomas Eich – Puma Combo bass amp powering Jon Hammond’s organ
Dankeschoen to Yücel Atiker, Tino Pavlis, Poehl, Bernie Capicchiano, Michael Falkenstein Hammond Suzuki Deutschland, Peggy Behling, Christine Vogel Messe Frankfurt,
Saray Pastanesi Baeckerei & Konditorei for Chocolate on Chocolate
25 Years Musikmesse Celebration Cake — at Jazzkeller

North Beach San Francisco — Max Roach and tenor saxophonist Odean Pope circa 1981 at Keystone Korner club in SF. I shot this photo with my Nikon F3 just after I came back from my first trip to Paris, Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Roach
Maxwell Lemuel “Max” Roach (January 10, 1924 – August 16, 2007) was an American jazz percussionist, drummer, and composer.
A pioneer of bebop, Roach went on to work in many other styles of music, and is generally considered alongside the most important drummers in history.[1][2] He worked with many famous jazz musicians, including Coleman Hawkins, Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, Billy Eckstine, Stan Getz, Sonny Rollins, Clifford Brown, Eric Dolphy and Booker Little.
Roach also led his own groups, and made numerous musical statements relating to the civil rights movement of African Americans.
Early life and career
Roach was born in the Township of Newland, Pasquotank County, North Carolina, which borders the southern edge of the Great Dismal Swamp, to Alphonse and Cressie Roach. Many confuse this with Newland Town in Avery County. Although Roach’s birth certificate lists his date of birth as January 10, 1924,[3] Roach has been quoted by Phil Schaap as having stated that his family believed he was born on January 8, 1925. Roach’s family moved to the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York when he was 4 years old. He grew up in a musical home, his mother being a gospel singer. He started to play bugle in parade orchestras at a young age. At the age of 10, he was already playing drums in some gospel bands. As an eighteen year-old fresh out of Boys High School in Brooklyn, (1942) he was called to fill in for Sonny Greer, and play with the Duke Ellington Orchestra performing at the Paramount Theater.
In 1942, Roach started to go out in the jazz clubs of the 52nd Street and at 78th Street & Broadway for Georgie Jay’s Taproom (playing with schoolmate Cecil Payne).[4]
Roach’s most significant innovations came in the 1940s, when he and jazz drummer Kenny Clarke devised a new concept of musical time. By playing the beat-by-beat pulse of standard 4/4 time on the “ride” cymbal instead of on the thudding bass drum, Roach and Clarke developed a flexible, flowing rhythmic pattern that allowed soloists to play freely. The new approach also left space for the drummer to insert dramatic accents on the snare drum, “crash” cymbal and other components of the trap set.
By matching his rhythmic attack with a tune’s melody, Roach brought a newfound subtlety of expression to his instrument. He often shifted the dynamic emphasis from one part of his drum kit to another within a single phrase, creating a sense of tonal color and rhythmic surprise.[1] The idea was to shatter musical conventions and take full advantage of the drummer’s unique position. “In no other society”, Roach once observed, “do they have one person play with all four limbs.”[5]
While that approach is common today, when Clarke and Roach introduced the new style in the 1940s it was a revolutionary musical advance. “When Max Roach’s first records with Charlie Parker were released by Savoy in 1945,” jazz historian Burt Korall wrote in the Oxford Companion to Jazz, “drummers experienced awe and puzzlement and even fear.” One of those awed drummers, Stan Levey, summed up Roach’s importance: “I came to realize that, because of him, drumming no longer was just time, it was music.”[1]
He was one of the first drummers (along with Kenny Clarke) to play in the bebop style, and performed in bands led by Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins, Bud Powell, and Miles Davis. Roach played on many of Parker’s most important records, including the Savoy November 1945 session, a turning point in recorded jazz.

New York NY — Hanging out with 2 of my favorite jazz pianists extraordinaire – L to R Yovanne Pierre, Richard Clements, Jon Hammond at Local 802 Musicians Union Monday Night Jazz Session — with Yovanne Pierre at Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM

Berkeley CA — My faithful 1965 Fender Band-Master amp head on the bench for a tuneup – Jon Hammond
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jonhammond/2834503143/
Jon Hammond’s rig at Leo’s: 1965 Fender Bandmaster amp head with Bag End S15X-D cabinet

Anaheim California — My Soul Brother for many years “Tachi” Waichiro Tachikawa arriving all the way from beautiful Hamamatsu Japan,
Jon Hammond
2012 Winter NAMM Show International Music Action — with Waichiro Tachikawa at The NAMM Show

Jon Hammond and Bernard Purdie — enjoy all the videos since 1989 folks!
http://www.youtube.com/results?client=safari&rls=en&q=jon+hammond+bernard+purdie&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=w1
SIDEWINDER-JON HAMMOND Band w/BERNARD PURDIE drums 1989
This outstanding 1989 film clip captures the excitement and up-close look at the very-first pairing up of organist JON HAMMOND’S combo www …
5 years ago | 35,528 views You +1’d this
by JonHammondBand
3:54
RIP Cornell Dupree aka ‘Mr. 2500’ (records)! Jon Hammond at Mikell’s
Jon Hammond RIP Cornell Dupree aka ‘Mr. 2500’ (records)! Jon Hammond – my 1959 B3 organ, Bernard Purdie drums, Chuggy Carter percussion at …
4 years ago | 72,716 views You +1’d this
by JonHammondBand

Anaheim California — Hammond Suzuki Leslie Sound –
Joe Berger – Leslie G37 Combo Amp Speaker
Koei Tanaka – Suzuki Chromatic Harmonica
Jon Hammond – Hammond Sk1
Youtube http://youtu.be/RvjqYJ6F0WU
Winter NAMM Show – Suzuki Harmonica artist KOEI TANAKA from Tokyo Japan http://www.tanakakoei.com/ with JOE BERGER aka The Berger-Meister on guitar through Leslie G37 guitar combo amp – Mercy Mercy Mercy! — with Joe Berger and Koei Tanaka at The NAMM Show

Hammond Suzuki Leslie Sound – Joe Berger G37 Koei Tanaka Suzuki Harmonica Jon Hammond Sk1 Hammond

August 21, 2012

Hammond Suzuki Leslie Sound – Joe Berger G37 Koei Tanaka Suzuki Harmonica Jon Hammond Sk1 Hammond

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Hammond Suzuki Leslie Sound

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondNAMM2012SundayBluesSessionHammondSuzukiMercyMercySk1

Anaheim California — Hammond Suzuki Leslie Sound –
Joe Berger – Leslie G37 Combo Amp Speaker
Koei Tanaka – Suzuki Chromatic Harmonica
Jon Hammond – Hammond Sk1
Youtube http://youtu.be/RvjqYJ6F0WU
Winter NAMM Show – Suzuki Harmonica artist KOEI TANAKA from Tokyo Japan http://www.tanakakoei.com/ with JOE BERGER aka The Berger-Meister on guitar through Leslie G37 guitar combo amp – Mercy Mercy Mercy! — with Joe Berger and Koei Tanaka at The NAMM Show
*Note: Stevie Wonder plays Suzuki Chromatic Harmonicas now like Koei – same like Stevie played at The White House when he performed “Alfie” – Koei Tanaka is a phenomenal player, known as Suzuki Santa, he brings the message of music to many young people who need it the most. Very powerful folks! Jon Hammond and Joe Berger are both Members of Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM and ASCAP


Behind The Beat http://behindthebeat.com/2004/12/jon-hammond-late-rent/
Jon Hammond says “the fingers are the singers.”

Hammond Suzuki Leslie Sound, G37, Chromatic Harmonica, Sk1, organ, NAMM Show, Koei Tanaka, Lightweight, Compact, Portable, Funky, Blues, Jazz, Rock Music

Priceless Al Jazzbo Collins Movie Jon Hammond Journal August 20, 2012

August 20, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Priceless Al Jazzbo Collins Movie by Jon Hammond

http://archive.org/details/AlJazzboCollinsHornAndHardartCnnBroadcastByJonHammond

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NwfEsLvmTw

As seen on The Jon Hammond Show MCTV MNN TV cable access show with the classic opening by famous Weather Man Lloyd Lindsay Young and CNN live radio broadcast extravaganza AM 1130 WNEW All Star Show Hosted by the late great Al Jazzbo Collins aka Jazzbeaux Collins
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_%22Jazzbo%22_Collins
covered by Jon Hammond personally on May 29, 1987
Radio Hall of Fame http://www.bayarearadio.org/audio/jazzbeaux/
Incredible dialogue between Al Jazzbo Collins and Cynthia Tornquist of CNN she learns a lot from Jazzbeaux about the Purple Grotteaux and the night world of Jazz Musicians and the special people in the Al’s world. Whether Cynthia knows it or not she is being majooberized!
Jazzbo leads the famous call and response based on the 1948 film The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. In one scene some obviously very bad banditos try to pass themselves off to Bogart as federales (police). Humphrey Bogart’s character knows they are not federales but nevertheless asks to see some badges. The bandito-in-charge responds “Badges?! I don’t got no badges. We don’t need no badges! I don’t have to show you any stinkin’ badge.”
Most special broadcast and painting of the manhole cover door to Purple Grotteaux seen world wide on CNN TV as shot by Jon Hammond personally, enjoy folks!
*Note: The phone number for BackBeat Productions running on this clip was taken over by the IRS Internal Revenue Servie after a long battle with Jon Hammond, they had a bank of numbers 340-9000, 9001 etc. so they really wanted 212-340-9007 they finally got it. If you call it now you’ll get the IRS not Jon Hammond folks! Special thanks Lew Anderson big band, Lew was Clarabell the Clown on Howdy Doody TV Show between 1954 and 1960 his music playing while Jon Hammond takes you on a tour of the food of Horn & Hardart Automat at corner of 42nd St. and Third Avenue in Manhattan just below the main studios of WNEW Radio, now 1130 is Bloomberg Radio. For more information http://www.HammondCast.com Jon Hammond Show is still on the air 28th year MNNTV in New York City

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/al-jazzbo-collins-horn-and-hardart-cnn-broadcast-by-jon-hammond-5727732

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYLdzFgC?p=1 width=”596″ height=”334″]

Jon Hammond Coverage of Jimmy Wormworth 75-Ain’t-No-Jive Birthday Party in Metropolitan Room New York City

New York NY — George Braith apparently checking his SMS text messages while James Zollar takes a few smokin’ choruses! George is one of the rare veteran jazz musicians who embrace technology, great work cats! Neal Miner is rock solid on the basso profundo…someone tell me the drummer’s name? Exellent! Incredible music throughout Jimmy Wormworth’s birthday celebration yesterday 75-Ain’t-No-Jive in NYC’s Metropolitan Room – Jon Hammond — with George Braith, Neal Miner and James Zollar at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — I loved this part of the party for Jimmy Wormworth birthday party 75-Ain’t-No-Jive, most amazing Tabla drums player who I believe is Jimmy’s Dentist and his guitarist, really beautiful music! Jon Hammond — at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — One of the incredible high points of Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive Birthday party yesterday, Priscilla led everyone in very strong soulful voice in Stevie Wonder’s version of Happy Birthday to Jimmy & Nico! God bless Professor Priscilla doing god’s working teaching the elementary school classes in Brooklyn NYC! Some really great singers in the house, wow..that was very moving! Jon Hammond — with Mary Worm, Russell Jackson, Jimmy Wormworth and Tracy Wormworth at The Metropolitan Room

Tracy Wormworth Thanks so much Jon, for the beautiful commentary and pictures, and for attending the party!!!

Jon Hammond Many thanks Tracy! Best time I’ve had in a long time, your Dad is so cool and beloved by so many cool people – he is a shining beacon of inspiration and your Family is really beautiful! God bless, c u soon again hopefully, Jon

New York NY — Howard Brofsky blew everybody away when he played yesterday at Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive birthday party! I heard Howard tell Jimmy before he played, “This is for you Jimmy!” bravo Professor Howard Brofsky!!! – Jon Hammond
http://www.vtjazz.org/faculty/2008/12/howard-brofsky.html
Dr. Brofsky has enjoyed a long and distinguished career in Jazz Education as well as in 18th-century Italian music
. His numerous accomplishments include Fulbright grants to study and teach in France (where he made his first jazz recording) and Italy.

He spent the fall of 1993 teaching jazz history to university students in Oslo, Norway and is the author of the definitive music appreciation text, “The Art of Listening.”

A regular with Larry Rivers and the Climax Band in New York, he has played with Jimmy Heath, Donald Byrd, Dexter Gordon, and other Jazz Greats. He has a recent CD entitled “73 down: drbebop,” with among others, Attila Zoller, Jimmy Heath, and Larry Willis.

Brofsky is also Professor Emeritus of Music at Queens College, NY.
— at The Metropolitan Room. — at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — Main man Rudy Sheriff Lawless kicked it off on the cans with George Braith yesterday at Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive birthday party, fantastic and dynamic as always Rudy! Jon Hammond — at The Metropolitan Room.

Jon Hammond tumblr tumblin’ on a beautiful Monday folks! http://hammondcast.tumblr.com/ , enjoy! Jon

New York NY — Trumpeter James Zollar sounded fantastic with these fine rhythm section musicians, Neal Miner bass – please someone drummer’s name? at Jimmy Wormworth’s incredible birthday party last night! – Jon Hammond — with James Zollar at The Metropolitan Room

Auster Bar Hamburg Jon Hammond Band
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-NEkNftUz4
Auster Bar Jazz Bar Michael Leuschner Presents Jon Hammond Band

One Night Only on the Henriettenweg Hamburg, very cool scene!
Jon Hammond original composition “Lydia’s Tune” with Michael Leuschner flugelhorn, Heinz Lichius drums,
Joe Berger guitar, Jon Hammond at Sk1 Hammond organ and bass — at Auster Bar

Joe Berger and Jon Hammond at National Association of Broadcasters convention – NAB a few years ago…maybe 25 years ago, maybe more than that come to think of it!

with Joe Berger at NAB-National Association of Broadcasters, Las Vagas Convention Center

Billy Cobham and Jon Hammond outside Yamaha world at 2012 Musikmesse Frankfurt — with Billy Cobham and Bill Cobham

Jon Hammond with Bobby Kimball of Toto backstage just about to go out and play on Agora Stage with Tommy Denander Allstars – photo by Oskar Neubauer – 2012 Musikmesse Frankfurt

Jon Hammond with Bobby Kimball

My Brother from another Mother ‘Bro T’ Waichiro Tachikawa and Jon Hammond at Jon’s annual Musikmesse Warm Up Party
https://hammondcast.wordpress.com/2011/10/05/26th-year-musikmesse-warm-up-party-will-be-march-20th-2012-jazzkeller-frankfurt/
26th Year Musikmesse Warm Up Party Will Be March 20th 2012

Jon Hammond with “Tachi” Waichiro Tachikawa

Wynton receives French Legion of Honor Medal at French Embassy New York City
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSMA9rEOFMI
French Ambassador Pierre Vimont presents Wynton Marsalis the insignia of chevalier of the Legion of Honor medal, France’s highest distinction, in a very special ceremony at the French Embassy in New York by French Cultural Services.

In attendance were Bill Cosby, George Wein, Jean-Louis Gilhaumon, George Avakian and Wynton’s Father Mr. Ellis Marsalis. With a performance by Wynton’s quintet with saxophonist Walter Blanding Jr. and Ellis Marsalis at the Steinway Piano with his son – Jon Hammond — with Wynton Marsalis at Cultural Services | French Embassy in the US

Pic with main man Rudy Sheriff Lawless (yes that’s really his name) Rudy is without a doubt the most dynamic drummer I have ever played with…and he is a shining beacon of inspiration always! at Local 802 Musicians Union Monday Night Jazz Jam Session – Jon Hammond

Anton Fig having a word with the late great drummer Joe Morello who passed away this year, Joe was the drummer of The Dave Brubeck Quartet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Morello
on jazz classic hits “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” – photo by Jon Hammond at memorial concert event in memory of Jim Chapin the great drum teacher, author http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Chapin

with Anton Fig and Joe Morello at Hard Rock Cafe – Times Square

New York NY — Jon Hammond with my all time favorite and most probably the most recorded jazz bassist (and piccolo bassist) Ron Carter and his gorgeous lady – there in honor of Jimmy Wormworth’s Birthday, incredible party! It was great to see Ron there, I actually know Ron and his son Ron Jr. for almost 30 years, Ron Jr. is an excellent bassist in his own right now living in Boston MA, big shout out to Ron Jr.! Long-time close friends of the Wormworth’s, merci beaucoup and thank you big Ron! Jon Hammond

New York NY — I love this shot of my good friend Richard Clements jazz pianist extraordinaire playing in honor of Jimmy Wormworth’s swingin’ 75th birthday party – sounded great Richard!

New York NY — John Marshall trumpet / flugel horn player of the Cologne Radio WDR Big Band and good friend of Jimmy playing with saxophonist – inventor of the Braithophone George Braith and a wonderful pianist Richard WyandsNew York NY —
great music guys! Jon Hammond

Jimmy Wormworth’s 75-Ain’t-No-Jive Birthday Party — with George Braith and John Marshall at The Metropolitan Room

Jimmy Wormworth the great jazz drummer at the drums with Elmar Lemes the fantastic Jazz Photographer shooting Jimmy, I’m sure his pictures will be better than mine, the masters at work!

Jon Hammond with Jimmy Wormworth at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — Birthday honoree / jazz drummer(s) extraordinaire Jimmy Wormworth tightening the clutch for his long-time friend Rudy Sheriff Lawless at Jimmy’s 75-Aint-No-Jive Birthday Party

Jon Hammond — with Jimmy Wormworth and Rudy Lawless at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — Jimmy Wormworth 75-Ain’t-No-Jive Party – Jimmy’s family with daughter Holly Wormworth at the microphone and 2 of the jazz angels from Jazz Foundation of America – Marianne Pillsbury and Gina Reder aka Gina Jazz – Jon Hammond incredibly great party!

with Holly Wormworth, Mary Worm, Faith A. Gibson and Jimmy Wormworth at The Metropolitan Room

Holly Wormworth Thank you Marianne and Gina for being there for all that you folks do at The JFA

New York NY — My good friend bassist extraordinaire Alex Layne with his gorgeous lady friend, Alex played with the all star musicians this evening for the birthday party of Jimmy Wormworth the great jazz drummer, Alex and I met all the way over in Shanghai China on Danny Woody’s band at Portman Ritz-Carlton Hotel 5 star Jazz Bar , nice job on the basso profundo Alex!

This was one of the best parties I’ve been to in a long time, happy birthday to Jimmy Wormworth and his Son Nico also! – Jon Hammond — with Alex Layne at The Metropolitan Room

Jon Hammond’s annual Musikmesse Warm Up Party in Jazzkeller Frankfurt featuring Tony Lakatos tenor saxophone, Giovanni Gulino drums, Joe Berger guitar, special guest:
Lee Oskar harmonica and Jon Hammond at the Hammond Sk1 organ powered by TecAmp 2 x 12 Neodymium rig special thanks to Thomas Eich TecAmp.
This evening marks 26 years continuous Musikmesse for Jon and also on his 59th birthday, special thanks to the Saray Pastanesi Baeckerei & Konditorei bakery for baking the beautiful Chocolate on Chocolate cake which you will see in this film, thanks Martina for wonderful presentation, Eugen Hahn, Marc and all Jazzkeller Frankfurt Team, Messe Frankfurt, P.Mauriat Music Saxophones Alex Mingmann Hsieh team, Suzuki Hammond, Tombo Lee Oskar team, camera by Jennifer http://www.HammondCast.com/ see you next year!
Pocket Funk as heard on The Jon Hammond Show TV program on MNNTV and on Late Rent album – Behind The Beat http://behindthebeat.com/2004/12/jon-hammond-late-rent/ by Steve Rosenfeld “Jon Hammond says “the fingers are the singers.'” The latest CD ..

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Nn6BjZoJyEk&feature=share

Lydia’s Tune in Louisville Kentucky
Jon Hammond Band one night only in Louisville Kentucky
Jon wrote this tune “Lydia’s Tune” in Paris France after flying there on the Concorde Jet in 1981 from JFK to CDG in 2 hours and 36 minutes reaching Mach II speed. From Jon Hammond’s album “Late Rent”.

http://vimeo.com/47799770

Alex Budman tenor sax
John Bishop guitar
Ronnie Smith Jr. drums
Jon Hammond at the organ and bass
jonhammondband.com

New York NY — Got the bass WELL covered here to say the least! with 2 of my very favorite bassists extraordinaire – Tracy Wormworth and Ron Carter *perhaps the most recorded jazz bassist in the history of the music business – at very special gathering in honor of Tracy’s Dad – Jimmy Wormworth the great jazz drummer, double birthday with her Brother Nico and many family and close friends musicians playing until the very end led by the very incredible George Braith – this was one of the best parties ever, and sponsored in part by the good folks at The Jazz Foundation of America in the Metropolitan Room on W.22nd St.

– Jon Hammond
Tracy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracy_Wormworth
Tracy Wormworth is a bass guitarist working for more than 30 years in the music and television industry in the United States. She is the sister of percussionist James Wormworth.[1]
Wormworth is currently[when?] playing with The B-52s, a band that she has played with on and off for 20 years.[1] She appears as an additional artist on the sixth studio album by The B-52s, Good Stuff, released in 1992. By 2008, she was listed as a full band member on their album Funplex.
She first gained notoriety as a member of the New Wave band The Waitresses.[2] Dave Hofstra was the bass player on the first album, Wasn’t Tomorrow Wonderful? (even though Wormworth’s picture appears in the photo on the back cover of the album). Wormworth joined the band after he quit and stayed until the band broke up in 1984.[3]
Wormworth has served as a touring bass player for Sting and Wayne Shorter as well as the B-52s and was part of the house band on The Rosie O’Donnell Show. She makes a brief appearance in the video for the B-52s’ single “Is That You Mo-Dean?”. She is credited as a bass player on the Lena Horne album We’ll Be Together Again (1994), I Ain’t Movin’ (1994) by singer-songwriter Des’ree, and Head over Heels (1995) by Paula Abdul.
Ron Carter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Carter
Ron Carter (born May 4, 1937) is an American jazz double-bassist. His appearances on over 2,500 albums make him one of the most-recorded bassists in jazz history, along with Milt Hinton, Ray Brown and Leroy Vinnegar. Carter is also an acclaimed cellist who has recorded numerous times on that instrument
Carter was born in Ferndale, Michigan. He started to play cello at the age of 10, but when his family moved to Detroit, he ran into difficulties regarding the racial stereotyping of classical musicians and instead moved to bass. He attended the historic Cass Technical High School in Detroit, and, later, the Eastman School of Music, where he played in its Philharmonic Orchestra. He gained his bachelor’s degree at Eastman in 1959, and in 1961 a master’s degree in double bass performance from the Manhattan School of Music.
His first jobs as a jazz musician were with Jaki Byard and Chico Hamilton. His first records were made with Eric Dolphy (another former member of Hamilton’s group) and Don Ellis, in 1960. His own first date as leader, Where?, with Dolphy and Mal Waldron and a date also with Dolphy called Out There with George Duvivier and Roy Haynes and Carter on cello; its advanced harmonies and concepts were in step with the third stream movement.
Carter came to fame via the second great Miles Davis quintet in the early 1960s, which also included Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Tony Williams. Carter joined Davis’s group in 1963, appearing on the album Seven Steps to Heaven and the follow-up E.S.P., the latter being the first album to feature only the full quintet. It also featured three of Carter’s compositions (the only time he contributed compositions to Davis’s group). He stayed with Davis until 1968 (when he was replaced by Dave Holland), and participated in a couple of studio sessions with Davis in 1969 and 1970. Although he played electric bass occasionally during this period, he has subsequently eschewed that instrument entirely, and now plays only acoustic bass. Carter was close to Davis and even revealed to an interviewer in 1966 that the famous trumpeter’s favorite color was fuchsia.[2]
Carter also performed on some of Hancock, Williams and Shorter’s recordings during the sixties for Blue Note Records. He was a sideman on many Blue Note recordings of the era, playing with Sam Rivers, Freddie Hubbard, Duke Pearson, Lee Morgan, McCoy Tyner, Andrew Hill, Horace Silver and others.
After leaving Davis, Carter was for several years a mainstay of CTI Records, making albums under his own name and also appearing on many of the label’s records with a diverse range of other musicians. Notable musical partnerships in the 70’s and 80’s included Joe Henderson, Houston Person, Hank Jones, and Cedar Walton. During the 1970s he was a member of the New York Jazz Quartet.
He appears on the alternative hip-hop group A Tribe Called Quest’s influential album The Low End Theory on a track called “Verses from the Abstract”. He also appears as a member of the jazz combo the Classical Jazz Quartet.
In 1994, Carter appeared on the Red Hot Organization’s compilation album, Stolen Moments: Red Hot + Cool. The album, meant to raise awareness and funds in support of the AIDS epidemic in relation to the African American community, was heralded as “Album of the Year” by Time Magazine. In 2001, Carter collaborated with Black Star and John Patton to record “Money Jungle” for the Red Hot Organization’s compilation album, Red Hot + Indigo, a tribute to Duke Ellington.
Carter was Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Music Department of The City College of New York, having taught there for twenty years,[3] and received an honorary Doctorate from the Berklee College of Music, in Spring 2005 [4]. He joined the faculty of the Juilliard School in New York City in 2008, teaching bass in the school’s Jazz Studies program.
Carter made a notable appearance in Robert Altman’s 1996 film Kansas City. The end credits feature him and fellow bassist Christian McBride duetting on “Solitude”.
Ron Carter sits on the Advisory Committee of the Board of Directors of The Jazz Foundation of America as well as the Honorary Founder’s Committee.[5] Ron has worked with the Jazz Foundation since its inception to save the homes and the lives of America’s elderly jazz and blues musicians including musicians that survived Hurricane Katrina.[6]
Carter appeared as himself in an episode of the HBO series Treme entitled “What Is New Orleans.”
Carter’s authorized biography, “Ron Carter: Finding the Right Notes,” by Dan Ouellette was published by ArtistShare in 2008.
[edit]Discography

As leader

1961: Where? (Prestige Records) with Eric Dolphy, Charlie Persip, Mal Waldron, George Duvivier
1966: Out Front (Prestige)
1969: Uptown Conversation (Embryo Records)
1973: Blues Farm (CTI)
1973: All Blues (CTI)
1974: Spanish Blue (CTI)
1975: Anything Goes (Kudu)
1976: Yellow & Green (CTI)
1976: Pastels (Milestone)
1977: Piccolo (Milestone)
1977: Third Plane (Milestone)
1978: 1+3 (JVC) trio live with Hank Jones or Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams
1978: Peg Leg (Milestone)
1978: Standard Bearers
1979: Parade
1980: New York Slick (Milestone)
1980: Patrao
1980: Empire Jazz
1980: Pick ‘Em (Milestone)
1981: Super Strings (Milestone)
1990: Carnaval
1991: Meets Bach (Blue Note)
1992: Friends (Blue Note)
1994: Jazz, My Romance (Blue Note)
1995: Mr. Bow Tie (Blue Note)
1995: Brandenburg Concerto (Blue Note)
1997: The Bass and I
1998: So What (Blue Note) trio with Kenny Barron and Lewis Nash
1999: Orfeu (Blue Note)
2001: When Skies Are Grey (Blue Note)
2002: Stardust (Blue Note)
2003: The Golden Striker (Blue Note)
2003: Eight Plus
2003: Ron Carter Plays Bach
2006: Live at The Village Vanguard
2007: Dear Miles featuring his quartet Stephen Scott, piano, Payton Crossley, drums and Roger Squitero, percussion
2008: Jazz and Bossa
2011: Ron Carter’s Great Big Band (Sunnyside Records) — with Tracy Wormworth and Ron Carter at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — Jimmy Wormworth veteran jazz drummer extraordinaire and his beautiful family at his 75-Ain’t-No-Jive birthday party double birthday with Jimmy’s son Nico, Faith A. Gibson, daughters Holly Wormworth and Tracy Wormworth – Jon Hammond

with Jimmy Wormworth, Mary Worm, Faith A. Gibson, Holly Wormworth and Tracy Wormworth at The Metropolitan Room

New York NY — Main Men Jimmy Wormworth jazz drummer extraordinaire and one of oldest friends bandmates George Braith outside Metropolitan Room on 22nd St. at Jimmy’s Ain’t No Jive 75 Birthday Party – photo Jon Hammond

Jimmy Wormworth, Al Jazzbo Collins, Ron Carter, Drummer, Bassist, Jon Hammond, Jazz, Organ, Richard Clements, Rudy Lawless, Jazz Foundation of America, Gina Reder, Marianne Pillsbury

Lydia’s Tune in Louisville and Jon Hammond Journal August 18, 2012

August 18, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Lydia’s Tune in Louisville

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondLydia_sTuneinLouisvilleKentucky/

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNa5ZLGTWQc

Jon Hammond Band one night only in Louisville Kentucky
Jon wrote this tune “Lydia’s Tune” in Paris France after flying there on the Concorde Jet in 1981 from JFK to CDG in 2 hours and 36 minutes reaching Mach II speed. From Jon Hammond’s album “Late Rent”.
Alex Budman tenor sax
John Bishop guitar
Ronnie Smith Jr. drums
Jon Hammond at the organ and bass
http://www.jonhammondband.com
Category:
Music
Category:
Music

CNN iReport http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-830122

Frankfurt Germany — HR Radio Studios live broadcast The Kenny and Benny Show – Jon Hammond

Kenny Burrell and Benny Golson
https://hammondcast.wordpress.com/2011/09/20/hessischer-rundfunk-kenny-and-benny-meet-bing-and-bong-jon-hammond-reporting-from-frankfurt/
Hessischer Rundfunk Kenny and Benny Meet Bing and Bong Jon Hammond Reporting From Frankfurt
Historic hr-Bigband Frankfurt Radio Bigband Concert and Broadcast News Brought To You By Jon Hammond in Frankfurt: special guests guitarist Kenny Burrell and saxophonist composer

Benny Golson aka The Kenny and Benny Show, because at the time the hr-Bigband had Kurt Bong

and Herbert Bings, this was the historic night that as Jon Hammond says:

“The Kenny and Benny met Bing and Bong !”

Photo of broadcast

Kenny and Benny Meet Bing and Bong – JH — with Kenny Burrell and Benny Golson at hr1

Louisville Kentucky — Jon Hammond Band enjoying a celebration drink of Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey after a successful one nighter at The Jazz Factory club

L to R John Bishop, Alex Budman, Ronnie Smith, Jon Hammond – Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olub20ZlmMI
Jon Hammond Band one night only in Louisville Kentucky
Jon’s tune “Pocket Funk” featuring drummer Ronnie Smith Jr. on this one
Alex Budman tenor sax
John Bishop guitar
Jon Hammond at the organ and bass
*From Jon’s album “Late Rent”
http://www.jonhammondband.com/ — at Louisville Glassworks

Hannover Germany — Jon Hammond with Kenny Burrell
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenny_Burrell

Kenneth Earl “Kenny” Burrell (born July 31, 1931) is an American jazz guitarist. His playing is grounded in bebop and blues; he has performed and recorded with a wide range of jazz musicians.
Burrell was born in Detroit, Michigan to a musical family and began playing guitar at the age of 12. His influences as a guitar player include Charlie Christian, Django Reinhardt, and Wes Montgomery. While a student at Wayne State University, he made his debut recording as a member of Dizzy Gillespie’s sextet in 1951, later he recorded the “Ground Round” single at Fortune Records in Detroit. He toured with Oscar Peterson after graduating in 1955 and then moved to New York City in 1956.[1]
A consummate sideman, Burrell recorded with a wide range of prominent musicians. He also led his own groups since 1951 and recorded many well received albums.[1]
In the 1970s he began leading seminars about music, particularly Duke Ellington’s. A highly popular performer, he has won several jazz polls in Japan and the United Kingdom as well as the United States.
He has recorded about 106 albums, including Midnight Blue (1963), Blue Lights, Guitar Forms, Sunup To Sundown (1990), Soft Winds (1993), Then Along Came Kenny (1993), and Lotus Blossom (1995).
In 2001, Burrell performed “C Jam Blues” with Medeski, Martin & Wood for the Red Hot Organization’s compilation album Red Hot + Indigo, a tribute to Duke Ellington, which raised money for various charities devoted to increasing AIDS awareness and fighting the disease.
As of 1996, Burrell has served as Director of Jazz Studies at UCLA, mentoring such notable alumni as Gretchen Parlato and Kalil Wilson.[2] Burrell teaches a course titled “Ellingtonia”, examining the life and accomplishments of Duke Ellington. — with Kenny Burrell at Hannover

Hamburg St. Pauli Germany — The DOM is Open / zu öffnen!
Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger_Dom

The Hamburger Dom[1] is a large funfair held in Hamburg, at Heiligengeistfeld fair ground, in Northern Germany. With three fairs (spring, summer and winter) per year it is the biggest and the longest fair throughout Germany. It attracts approximately ten million visitors annually.[citation needed] This Volksfest (lit. peoples fair) is a funfair. It is located in the center of Hamburg on the Heiligengeistfeld.
[edit]History

A market in or in front of Hamburg’s Cathedral (German: Hamburger Dom) was first recorded in 1329, at the beginning only in special seasons like Christmas. With the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century the fair was also held at other times. After the demolition of the cathedral (1804–1807), the market was held on the Gänsemarkt (geese market) in 1804, but kept the name Dom. Since 1892, the funfair was held at Heiligengeistfeld (lit. field of the Holy Spirit) and the name was used for all fairs in the area.[2]
Winterdom or Dommarkt (winter fair or cathedral market): 30 days in late autum
Sommerdom or Hummelfest (summer fair or Hummel market):[3] since 1947: 31 days during summer
Frühlingsdom (spring fair): since 1948, 30 days in spring
[edit]References

^ The German term Dom (Italian: Duomo) is the synecdoche, used – pars pro toto – for most persisting or former collegiate churches and cathedrals alike. Therefore the uniform translation of this term into English as cathedral is correct in this case, but in many other cases it is inappropriate.
^ Eckardt, Hans Wilhelm (2005). “Hamburger Dom”. In Fanklin Kopitzsch and Daniel Tilgner (in German). Hamburg — at Hamburger Dom

Frankfurt Germany — R.I.P. Jon Lord pictured holding the new Hammond Sk1, Joe Berger and Jon Hammond

Frankfurt Germany — R.I.P. Jon Lord pictured holding the new Hammond Sk1, Joe Berger and Jon Hammond
aka Ham-Berger *Jon’s T-Shirt DuckDuckGo, alternative to
Google, the only non-following search engine from Gabriel Weinberg http://duckduckgo.com/ – here at Frankfurt
Musikmesse — with Jon Lord and Joe Berger

Frankfurt Germany — The old fighters – Professor Klaus Maier Father of Hammond Suzuki Deutschland and Jon Hammond at Frankfurt Musikmesse

friends since my first Musikmesse 26 years ago and his super talented dynamo son Michael Falkenstein – JH *with DuckDuckGo shirt, alternative to Google ! http://duckduckgo.com/ — with Klaus Maier at Musikmesse Frankfurt.

Fort Myers Florida — My last sighting of main man Lou Colombo R.I.P. on February 23, 2012 with his band just days before he left the planet – remembering Lou Colombo – Jon Hammond
L to R Gil DiBenedetto tenor saxophone and clarinet, Lou Colombo, Nelson Foucht on trombone, Richard “Richie” Iannuzzi drums *unseen F.L. “Woody” Brubaker piano

http://www.livinginhd.com/hammondcast/blog/2012/03/16/lou_colombo_movie_part_2_by_jon_hammond
*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Lou Colombo Movie Part 2 by Jon Hammond http://www.archive.org/details/LouColomboMoviePart2ByJonHammond

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcVNnbM2RjQ

*Note: To hear entire episode of HammondCast 201: http://www.archive.org/details/JonHammondHammondCast201KYOURadio — with Nelson Foucht at Roadhouse Cafe Fort Myers

New York NY — Carnegie Delicatessen, this is the last place I ran in to Bill Graham R.I.P. It was about 3 in the morning, Bill loved the Corned Beef there! I also met Milton Berle there. Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_Deli

The Carnegie Deli is a restaurant located in midtown Manhattan on 7th Avenue between 54th and 55th Streets and was opened in 1937 adjacent to Carnegie Hall. Now in the third generation of owners, the Parker family’s delicatessen is among the most visited restaurants of its type in the city, according to the New York Convention & Visitors Bureau. USA Today has called the restaurant the “most famous” deli in the United States.[1] It is operated by Sandy Levine, whose business card indicates he is the “MBD” = Married Boss’s Daughter, namely, Marian Parker.

A corned beef sandwich from the Carnegie Deli.
The restaurant offers pastrami, corned beef and other sandwiches containing at least one pound (0.45 kg) of meat, as well as traditional Jewish fare such as matzoh ball soup, potato pancakes, chopped chicken livers, and smoked salmon. The restaurant also offers other, non-Jewish (or at least non-kosher) food such as ham, sausage, and bacon. Available for order are cheesecake portions of over a pound per serving. The restaurant’s motto is: “If you can finish your meal, we’ve done something wrong”. In addition to the large servings, the restaurant is also known for its surly waiters, who allegedly try to impart some of the stereotypical gruffness of New York to visitors.
The Carnegie Deli was the favorite hangout of comedian Henny Youngman, and Adam Sandler included a reference to the deli in “The Chanukah Song” in 1996. The walls of the deli are nearly completely covered with autographed pictures of celebrities who have eaten there. Menu items have been named after famous patrons, including a corned beef and pastrami sandwich named after Woody Allen after the deli served as a filming location for Broadway Danny Rose. A number of items on the menu feature Broadway themes and Yiddish vocabulary, including dishes like “nosh, nosh, Nanette” (after the musical, “No, No, Nanette”) and “the egg and oy” (“The Egg and I”). There are also some humorous items in the menu, like the famous liver sandwich named “50 Ways to Love Your Liver” after the Paul Simon song “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover.” It is a place many reporters in the city frequent, including staffers from Black Rock (aka the CBS Building) like Bob Simon.
Owner Milton Parker, who died in 2009, had written a book (with Allyn Freeman) called How to Feed Friends and Influence People: The Carnegie Deli, providing the history of the family’s ownership. The book is sold at the cashier’s station.

A Reuben sandwich from the Carnegie Deli.
The deli opened several branch locations in the 1980s, including two New Jersey branches in Secaucus and Atlantic City and one in the Washington DC suburbs in Tysons Corner.[2] However, most of these branches have since closed and are no longer in operation. One, in Beverly Hills, California, was financed by oil billionaire Marvin Davis and designed by restaurant designer Pat Kuleto at a cost of $4 million to be the “best deli in the world,” in response to Davis’ complaint that the delis in California were not as good as those in New York.[3]
Currently, the deli operates a second location in Las Vegas, Nevada, which opened at The Mirage in 2005. A third location opened in 2006 at the Six Flags Great Adventure in New Jersey and serves as the “healthy choice” restaurant at the park; however, the menu is smaller and only has the restaurant’s most popular items. A fourth deli, limited to corned beef and pastrami sandwiches, is at Foxwoods Resort Casino. The fifth location is at the Sands Casino Resort in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and opened November 22, 2009.
In addition to the retail operation, the restaurant sells cheesecakes and merchandise such as t-shirts and baseball caps online — at Carnegie Delicatessen & Restaurant

New York NY — Ed Sullivan Theatre – CBS Studios for LATE SHOW with David Letterman, featuring Paul Shaffer and the CBS Orchestra – Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Sullivan_Theatre (Theatre/Theater…go figure!):

The Ed Sullivan Theater, located at 1697-1699 Broadway between West 53rd and West 54th, in Manhattan,[1] is a venerable radio and television studio in New York City. The 1200-seat theater — of which 461 seats are used for TV audiences — has been used as a venue for live and taped CBS broadcasts since 1936.[2]
It is best known as the longtime home of The Ed Sullivan Show and the site of the first U.S. Beatles performance. Since 1993, it has been the home of the Late Show with David Letterman and is on the list of National Register of Historic Places. The interior has been designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The 13-story, brown brick and terra cotta office building[3] with a ground-floor theater was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp.[1] It was built by Arthur Hammerstein between 1925 and 1927,[1] and was named Hammerstein’s Theater after his father, Oscar Hammerstein I. The original neo-Gothic interior contained pointed-arch stained-glass windows with scenes from the elder Hammerstein’s operas; during a 1993 renovation, these windows were removed and stored by CBS in an arrangement with the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.[3] Its first production was the three-hour musical Golden Dawn, the second male lead of which was Cary Grant, then still using his birth name, Archie Leach.[3] Arthur Hammerstein went bankrupt in 1931, and lost ownership of the building.[3]
It later went by the name Manhattan Theater, Billy Rose’s Music Hall, and the Manhattan once again.[citation needed] In the 1930s, it became a nightclub.[citation needed] After CBS obtained a long-term lease on the property, the radio network began broadcasting from there in 1936, moving in broadcast facilities it had leased at NBC Studios in Radio City.[3] Architect William Lescaze renovated the interior, keeping nearly all of the Krapp design but covering many walls with smooth white panels, his work earning praise from the magazine Architectural Forum.[3] The debut broadcast was the Major Bowes Amateur Hour.[3] The theater had various names during the network’s tenancy, including Radio Theater #3 and the CBS Radio Playhouse.[citation needed] It was converted for television in 1950, when it became CBS-TV Studio 50.[citation needed] In the early and mid-Fifties, the theater played host to many of the live telecasts of The Jackie Gleason Show.
Newspaper columnist and impresario Ed Sullivan, who had started hosting his variety show Toast of the Town, soon renamed The Ed Sullivan Show, from the Maxine Elliott Theatre (CBS Studio 51) on West 39th Street in 1948, moved to Studio 50 a few years later. The theater was renamed for Sullivan at the beginning of the 1967-68 season, though it is still TV Studio 50 in CBS’ numerical list of New York television facilities.[4]
In the 1960s, Studio 50 was one of CBS’ busiest stages not only for Sullivan’s program but also for The Merv Griffin Show,[5] as well as several game shows. In 1965, Studio 50 was converted to color, and the first color episode of The Ed Sullivan Show originated from the theater on October 31, 1965. (The program originated from CBS Television City in color for the previous six weeks while the color equipment was installed. One earlier color episode of the program originated from Studio 72 at Broadway and 81st on August 22, 1954.[6]) What’s My Line?, To Tell the Truth and Password also called the studio home after CBS began broadcasting regularly in color; previously, they had been taped around the corner at CBS-TV Studio 52, which later became the disco Studio 54. The first episode of regular color telecasts of What’s My Line? was broadcast live on September 11, 1966.[citation needed] Line and Truth remained at Studio 50 even after they moved from CBS to first-run syndication in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The programs eventually moved to NBC’s Radio City Studios at Rockefeller Center.[citation needed]
The Ed Sullivan Theater was also the first home for The $10,000 Pyramid, with its huge end-game board set at the rear of the stage, in 1973. Other short-lived game shows produced at the Ed included Musical Chairs with singer Adam Wade (1975), Shoot For The Stars with Geoff Edwards (1977) (which was an NBC show), and Pass the Buck with Bill Cullen (1978).
The CBS lease on the building expired in 1981[5] and, now a Reeves Entertainment teletape facility, it hosted the sitcom Kate & Allie, which ran from 1984 to 1989 (as it happened, on CBS). In 1990 David Niles/1125 Productions signed onto the lease, with the theater to house his HDTV studio and new Broadway show Dreamtime. On October 17, 1992 an NBC special celebrating Phil Donahue’s 25 years on television taped in the theater. In February 1993, during Dreamtime’s successful run, [1] CBS bought the building from Winthrop Financial Associates of Boston. Niles was given four weeks to vacate. Due to the economics of moving the show and the lack of a comparable available Broadway theater, Dreamtime closed. The quick sale and vacancy of the building earned the realtor the Henry Hart Rice Achievement Award[7] for the Most Ingenious Deal of the Year for 1993.[8]
[edit]The Late Show

The Ed Sullivan Theater in 2007.
When David Letterman switched networks from NBC to CBS, CBS bought the theater in February 1993 for $4 million from Winthrop Financial Associates of Boston.[9] The theater was reconfigured into a 461-seat studio, with lighting and sound adjustments. The architectural firm that did the work, Polshek Partnership, notes on its web site that “to preserve the architectural integrity of the landmark, all interventions are reversible.”[10]
In 2005, it took nearly four months to retrofit the theater with the cabling and equipment necessary to broadcast high definition television.[citation needed]
Near the beginning of the first Letterman show in the fall of 1993, a quick reference was made to Sullivan’s legacy, by splicing together several short clips of Sullivan introducing various acts, including, presumably, the singing group The Lettermen. This resulted in a fake clip of Sullivan saying, “And now, here on our stage… David… Letterman!” Letterman also joked that his crew opened an old closet in the theater which contained a 45-year old woman screaming, “Ringo!”
[edit]Other uses

The Ed Sullivan Theater also serves as the home of the Survivor reunion at the conclusion of each even numbered season beginning with season six (The Amazon). The theater also hosted marquee-top concerts by a few artists, including Phish in 2004, and Sir Paul McCartney in 2009. On July 15, 2002, Dave Matthews Band performed on the roof of the building, the day before the release of their latest album “Busted Stuff”. On June 22, 2010, the theater’s roof was used once again, serving as the site of a concert featuring Eminem and Jay-Z. The theater also served as an emergency Back-up stage for The Rosie O’Donnell Show for a week of shows in October 1996 when a handful of Studios at NBC’s 30 Rockefeller Center headquarters experienced complications from an electrical fire. — at Ed Sullivan Theater

New York NY — Port Authority Bus Station Lanes from Lincoln Tunnel – Here they come! (and go) special lanes leading to and from Port Authority from Lincoln Tunnel going in to the State of New Jersey – Jon Hammond
http://www.panynj.gov/bridges-tunnels/lincoln-tunnel.html

Soon after the Port Authority of NY & NJ acquired the Holland Tunnel in 1930, New York and New Jersey authorized the agency to proceed with its plan to build what was then called the Midtown Hudson Tunnel. Creating a 1.5-mile-long structure, even above ground, would be no small accomplishment, but to build it under a riverbed was a monumental task. Hundreds of huge iron rings, each weighing 21 tons, had to be assembled and bolstered together on-site to form the lining of the tunnel.

The work of the sandhogs—as workers who dig tunnels are still colloquially known—was dangerous, claustrophobic and tedious. Just entering and exiting the tunnel was time-consuming. Crews entered air locks, one at a time, after which the doors at each end were sealed. An air pipe started hissing, and the men’s ears would pop as the air pressure climbed until it equaled that of the adjoining lock. The workers were then able to safely open the connecting door and crowd into the next section, where the entire ordeal would be repeated. Once at the forward end of the tunnel, the men had to work swiftly because they could handle the pressure only briefly. Compression and decompression had to be reached in safe, short increments.

Inside the tunnel, rock drills roared, tram cars rattled back and forth and air lines hissed as the shield pushed the tunnel forward until it could be braced like the hull of a ship. Through this din, men bolted rings into place, poured cement behind the new lining to seal out the river, prepared for the next shove, and dynamited in front of the shield when the going got tough.

While one crew worked from the Jersey side, another proceeded toward them from the New York side. Alignment of both ends vertically and horizontally took considerable engineering skill and care. The first “hole through” was achieved on August 3, 1935, when a hydraulic engineer in the New Jersey end was pushed by his feet through an opening to meet the New York crew.

The first tube of the Lincoln Tunnel-the center tube-opened to traffic two years later, on December 22, 1937. The north and south tubes opened on February 1, 1945, and May 25, 1957, respectively.

On December 18, 1970, the Port Authority of NY & NJ opened the Exclusive Bus Lane (XBL), a 2.5-mile contra-flow bus lane that travels along NJ Route 495 leading from the NJ Turnpike to the Lincoln Tunnel (LT). When opened, the XBL was the first contra-flow bus lane on a freeway in the United States, and it led to the later implementation of several similar operations here and in other states. Each weekday morning, the 2.5-mile XBL dedicates a westbound travel lane to eastbound buses, essentially making the Lincoln Tunnel a mass-transit facility for morning commuters. The XBL serves over 1,700 buses a day, carrying more than 62,000 passengers to midtown Manhattan every weekday morning.

E-ZPass, an electronic form of toll collection, was first introduced at the Lincoln Tunnel on October 28, 1997.

The Port Authority of NY & NJ continues to operate and maintain this facility, while seeking new and innovative ways to process an ever-increasing volume of traffic safely and more efficiently. Future plans include the rehabilitation of the “Helix,” the series of entry ramps to the tunnel on the New Jersey side. — at Lincoln Tunnel.

Keys To Happiness – Jon Hammond Plays Excelsior Accordions

lydia’s tune, concorde jet, paris, air france, excelsior accordions, organ jazz, louisville kentucky, kenny burrell, benny golson, tv show, radio, local 802

Pocket Funk Louisville and Jon Hammond Journal Auguest 17, 2012

August 17, 2012

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Pocket Funk Louisville Kentucky

http://archive.org/details/PocketFunkInLouisvilleKentucky

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olub20ZlmMI

Jon Hammond Band one night only in Louisville Kentucky
Jon’s tune “Pocket Funk” featuring drummer Ronnie Smith Jr. on this one
Alex Budman tenor sax
John Bishop guitar
Jon Hammond at the organ and bass
*From Jon’s album “Late Rent”
http://www.jonhammondband.com

ENCORES: Louisville Kentucky Jazz Factory – JON HAMMOND Band
Jazzin By Martin Z. Kasdan Jr.
Last year San Francisco-based organist Jon Hammond joined his buddy, Louisville guitarist John Bishop, for a night at the Jazz Factory. Hammond has just released Late Rent, on Ham-Berger-Friz Records, available at http://www.cityhallrecords.com/artist/HAMMOND,%20JON.htm if you can’t find it locally. In an e-mail to me, Hammond described this as “a record that took me 25 years to put together. The disc opens with “Late Rent,” a loping swinger and is followed by “Pocket Funk,” with a slightly Latin feel. “Late Rent” is reprised in a live take at the end of the CD. Lee Morgan’s funky “The Sidewinder” is the only cover tune on the album, although, as Hammond acknowledges in his liner notes, “White Onions” is “a bluesy Hammond/Finnerty composition reminiscent of `Green Onions.'”

In closing, happy holidaze to one and all. You can send greetings to me at mzkjr@yahoo.com

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/pocket-funk-in-louisville-kentucky-6309220

Pat Campbell · Friends with Joe Berger and 16 others
Tear it up Jon !!!!

Loretta Young-Watkins · 2 mutual friends
you go Ron!

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOBi0gA?p=1 width=”320″ height=”270″]

http://vimeo.com/47701235

Pocket Funk in Louisville Kentucky from Jon Hammond on Vimeo.

New York NY — Window of Steinway Hall on W.57th Street
“Secrets of Steinway” pianos –
Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steinway_Hall

Steinway Hall (German: Steinway-Haus) is the name of buildings housing concert halls, showrooms and sales departments for Steinway & Sons pianos. The first Steinway Hall was opened 1866 in New York City.[1] Today, Steinway Halls and Steinway-Häuser are located in world cities such as New York City, London, Berlin and Vienna. A flagship Steinway Hall is on 57th Street in Manhattan in New York City, near Carnegie Hall.

New York NY — Power Corner – Intersection of Central Park South and Fifth Avenue, across from The Plaza Hotel on one corner, Apple Store Fifth Avenue and CBS News Broadcast Center, The Sherry Netherland Hotel

and A LA VIEILLE RUSSIE where people actually buy FABERGE, Antique Jewelry, and Russian Art – Jon Hammond

La Vieille Russie is a New York antiques gallery specializing in European and American antique jewelry, and in Russian works of art. A family business since its establishment in Kiev in 1851, it has been in its present Fifth Avenue location at 781 Fifth Avenue at 59th Street, opposite the southeast corner of Central Park, since 1961. Featured are artworks by Carl Fabergé, created for members of the Romanov court and other wealthy patrons in turn-of-the-century Russia. A La Vieille Russie has bought and sold many of the Fabergé Imperial Easter Eggs…

With the onset of World War II, the gallery relocated from Paris to New York. Initially, it was one of the first tenants at Rockefeller Center in 1934, then moved to another Fifth Avenue location in 1941, and finally to its present location in 1961 on New York’s famed Fifth Avenue, at 59th Street opposite the south entrance of Central Park. — at The Plaza Hotel.

New York NY — 9 West 57th Street, the famous Solow Building – in 1985 this is where I was called to a meeting with then Sony President John O’Donnell in the Sony Corporate offices on the 43rd Floor where he offered me a 7 year contract for my cable TV show “The Jon Hammond Show” to be exclusive on Sony on the new Software Division. At the time the only acts signed to this division on Sony Label were Tina Turner, David Bowie and an experimental project called “Private Dances” – Jon Hammond

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondMNNTVTheJonHammondShow now on MNN TV – 28th year
*Note: Sony vacated the 43rd Floor and moved to the Sony Building. The view from the offices on 43rd Floor were stunning! – JH
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9_West_57th_Street

The Solow Building, located at 9 West 57th Street, is a Manhattan skyscraper designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill’s Gordon Bunshaft and built in 1974. It is located just west of Fifth Avenue, sandwiched between the 57th and 58th Street, next to such prominent buildings as the Bergdorf Goodman department store and the Plaza Hotel. Consisting of 50 stories and 689 ft. (210 m), the building’s only competitor by height in the neighborhood is the GM Building, located one block north and east. Floors above the 23rd floor offer a virtually unobstructed view of northern Manhattan and a complete view of Central Park.
One of the notable aesthetic attributes of the building is the concave vertical slope of its north and south facades, on 57th and 58th Street. This is similar to another of Bunshaft’s creations, the W. R. Grace Building, which is no coincidence, as he had used the initial, rejected façade design for the Solow Building in his design for the Grace Building
The Solow Building features some of the most expensive rents in Manhattan. The Solow Building Company occupies a permanent lease of the top floor of the skyscraper. Well-known tenants include the U.S. Headquarters of the French Corporate and Investment Bank Natixis and private equity firms Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. (42nd fl.), Apollo Management (43rd fl.), Silver Lake Partners (32nd fl.) and Highland Capital Management (38th fl.).
Several law firms and hedge funds occupy a majority of the remainder the space, including Och-Ziff Capital Management (39th fl.) and Highbridge Capital Management (27th fl.). The corporate offices of Chanel (44th fl.), MBNA (50th fl.) and Cendant (Cendant changed its name to Avis Budget Group in 2006) (37th fl.) are also located in the building.
Amenities

The building features an underground parking garage, currently available retail space on the north side bordering 58th Street, an underground space occupied by the Brasserie 8½ restaurant, a 2 floor trading floor on floors 2-3, a newsstand in the lobby, and 24 high-speed elevators subdivided into sets of floors.
[edit]Name Issues

In 1971, Avon Products, Inc. rented 21 floors, quickly expanding to occupy 25 floors, and the building was soon being referred to as “the Avon building” (a moniker that persists and can still cause confusion nearly 40 years later). In 1975, the building’s owner, Sheldon Solow, sued Avon for misappropriating the building’s trademark without compensation. Although Avon moved out of the building in 1997, in May 2005 the lawsuit finally went to trial and was subsequently dismissed two months later.[3]
[edit]In popular culture

“The Red 9” in front of the Solow Building
The large red sculpture of the digit 9 in front of the building was included in the project as a response to the complaints that the building’s sloping reflecting walls revealed unappealing sides of the neighboring historic buildings that were previously obscured. The brightly colored sculpture was to distract the eyes of passersby from noticing these walls. This famous New York sculpture was designed by graphic artist Ivan Chermayeff.
The restaurant Brasserie 8½ was featured on the show Sex and the City.
Chandler Bing a character from the sitcom Friends worked in this building during the series.
Namesake of the Nine West shoe store chain.
In Superman, a jewel thief is apprehended by Superman while scaling the side of the building while wearing suction cups on his hands and knees[4].
Featured in the film Zoolander with a giant computer generated M, which served as Mugatu’s fashion headquarters.
In the film Cloverfield, the monster’s hand slides down the facade of the building when knocked down momentarily by a carpet bombing run.
In the film Lost in America, the final scene where Albert Brooks’ character David Howard meets advertising executive Brad (“This little town car…Will drive you away…”) occurs in front of this building.
Was featured in the film Bride Wars behind the “Plaza Hotel”. — at 9 West 57th.

New York NY — Artist Yayoi Kusama looking at the people looking at her in window of Louis Vuitton on Fifth Avenue and 57th St. today – Jon Hammond
http://www.yayoi-kusama.jp/e/information/index.html
(草間 彌生 or 草間 弥生, Kusama Yayoi, born March 22, 1929)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yayoi_Kusama

s a Japanese artist and writer. Throughout her career she has worked in a wide variety of mediums, including painting, collage, sculpture, performance art and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition and pattern. A precursor of the pop art, minimalist and feminist art movements, Kusama influenced contemporaries such as Andy Warhol and Claes Oldenburg.[1] Although largely forgotten after departing the New York art scene in the early 1970s, Kusama is now acknowledged as one of the most important living artists to come out of Japan, and an important voice of the avant-garde.
Born in Matsumoto, Nagano into an upper middle-class family of seedling merchants,[2] Kusama started creating art at an early age, going on to study Nihonga painting in Kyoto in 1948. Frustrated with this distinctly Japanese style, she became interested in the European and American avant-garde, staging several solo exhibitions of her paintings in Matsumoto and Tokyo during the 1950s. In 1957 she moved to the United States, settling down in New York City where she produced a series of paintings influenced by the abstract expressionist movement. Switching to sculpture and installation as her primary mediums, Kusama became a fixture of the New York avant-garde, having her works exhibited alongside the likes of Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg and George Segal during the early 1960s, where she became associated with the pop art movement. Embracing the rise of the hippie counterculture of the late 1960s, Kusama came to public attention after she organised a series of Body Festivals in which naked participants were painted with brightly colored polka dots.
In 1973, Kusama moved back to her native Japan, where she found the art scene far more conservative than that in New York. Becoming an art dealer, her business folded after several years, and after experiencing psychiatric problems, in 1977 she voluntarily admitted herself to a hospital, where she has spent the rest of her life. From here, she continued to produce artworks in a variety of mediums, as well as launching a literary career by publishing several novels, a poetry collection and an autobiography.
Kusama’s work is based in conceptual art and shows some attributes of feminism, minimalism, surrealism, Art Brut, pop art, and abstract expressionism, and is infused with autobiographical, psychological, and sexual content. Kusama is also a published novelist and poet, and has created notable work in film and fashion design. Major retrospectives of her work have been held at the Museum of Modern Art and Tate Modern, whilst in 2008 Christies New York sold a work by her for $5.1 million, a record for a living female artist
Born in Matsumoto, Nagano Prefecture as the fourth child in a prosperous and conservative family,[4] whose wealth was derived from the management of wholesale seed nurseries,[5] Kusama has experienced hallucinations and severe obsessive thoughts since childhood, often of a suicidal nature. She claims that as a small child she suffered severe physical abuse by her mother.[6] In 1948, she left home to enter senior class at Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, where she studied Nihonga painting, a rigorous formal style developed during the Meiji period; she graduated the following year.[7] She hated the rigidities of the master-disciple system where students were supposed to imbibe tradition through the sensei. “When I think of my life in Kyoto,” she is quoted, “I feel like vomiting.”[8]
[edit]Early success in Japan: 1950–1956
By 1950, Kusama was depicting abstracted natural forms in watercolor, gouache and oil, primarily on paper. She began covering surfaces (walls, floors, canvases, and later, household objects and naked assistants) with the polka dots that would become a trademark of her work. The vast fields of polka dots, or “infinity nets,” as she called them, were taken directly from her hallucinations. The earliest recorded work in which she incorporated these dots was a drawing in 1939 at age 10, in which the image of a Japanese woman in a kimono, presumed to be the artist’s mother, is covered and obliterated by spots.[9] Her first series of large-scale, sometimes more than 30 ft-long canvas paintings,[10] Infinity Nets, were entirely covered in a sequence of nets and dots that alluded to hallucinatory visions. In the early 1960s Kusama began to cover items such as ladders, shoes and chairs with white phallic protrusions.[11] Despite the micromanaged intricacy of the drawings, she turned them out fast and in bulk, establishing a rhythm of productivity she still maintains. She established other habits too, like having herself routinely photographed with new work.[12]
Since 1963, Kusama has continued her series of Mirror/Infinity rooms. In these complex installations, purpose-built rooms lined with mirrored glass contain scores of neon coloured balls, hanging at various heights above the viewer. Standing inside on a small platform, light is repeatedly reflected off the mirrored surfaces to create the illusion of a never-ending space.[13]
[edit]New York City: 1957–1972
After living in Tokyo and France, Kusama left Japan at the age of 27 for the United States. In 1957 she moved to Seattle, where she stayed for a year[14] before moving on to New York City, following correspondence with Georgia O’Keeffe in which she became interested in joining the limelight in the city.[15] During her time in the U.S., she quickly established her reputation as a leader in the avant-garde movement. In 1961 she moved her studio into the same building as Donald Judd and sculptor Eva Hesse; Hesse became a close friend. During the following years, she was enormously productive, and by 1966, she was experimenting with room-size, freestanding installations that incorporated mirrors, lights, and piped-in music. She counted Judd and Joseph Cornell among her friends and supporters. However, she did not profit financially from her work. Around this time, Kusama was hospitalised regularly from overwork, and O’Keeffe convinced her own dealer Edith Herbert to purchase several works in order to help Kusama stave off financial hardship.[16]
Kusama organized outlandish happenings in conspicuous spots like Central Park and the Brooklyn Bridge, often involving nudity and designed to protest the Vietnam War. In one, she wrote an open letter to Richard Nixon offering to have sex with him if he would stop the Vietnam war.[17] Between 1967 and 1969 she concentrated on performances held with the maximum publicity, usually involving Kusama painting polka dots on her naked performers, as in the Grand Orgy to Awaken the Dead at the MOMA (1969), which took place at the Sculpture Garden of the Museum of Modern Art.[18] In 1968, Kusama presided over the happening Homosexual Wedding at the Church of Self-obliteration in 33 Walker Street in New York, and performed alongside Fleetwood Mac and Country Joe and the Fish at the Fillmore East, New York City.[19] She opened naked painting studios and a gay social club called the Kusama ’Omophile Kompany (kok).[20]
In 1966, Kusama first participated in the 33rd Venice Biennale. Her Narcissus Garden comprised hundreds of mirrored spheres outdoors in what she called a ‘kinetic carpet’. As soon as the piece was installed on a lawn outside the Italian pavilion, Kusama, dressed in a golden kimono,[21] began selling each individual sphere for 1,200 lire ($2), until the Biennale organisers put an end to her enterprise. Perhaps one of Kusama’s most notorious works, Narcissus Garden was as much about the promotion of the artist through the media as it was an opportunity to offer a critique of the mechanisation and commodification of the art market. Various versions of Narcissus Garden have been presented worldwide venues including Le Consortium, Dijon, 2000; Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2003; as part of the Whitney Biennial in Central Park, New York in 2004; and at the Jardin de Tuileries in Paris, 2010.[22]
During her time in New York, Kusama had a decade-long sexless relationship with the American artist Joseph Cornell, Kusama’s only recorded romantic attachment to date.
[edit]Return to Japan: 1973–present

Yayoi Kusama’s Ascension of Polka Dots on the Trees at the Singapore Biennale 2006 on Orchard Road, Singapore.
In 1973, Kusama returned to Japan in ill health, where she began writing shockingly visceral and surrealistic novels, short stories, and poetry. Kusama checked herself into the Seiwa Hospital for the Mentally Ill and eventually took up permanent residence. She has been living at the hospital since, by choice. Her studio, where she has continued to produce work since the mid-1970s, is a short distance from the hospital in Shinjuku, Tokyo.[23] Kusama is often quoted as saying: “If it were not for art, I would have killed myself a long time ago.”[24] She continued to paint, but now in high-colored acrylics on canvas, on an amped-up scale.[25]
Yayoi Kusama said about her 1954 painting titled Flower (D.S.P.S),
One day I was looking at the red flower patterns of the tablecloth on a table, and when I looked up I saw the same pattern covering the ceiling, the windows and the walls, and finally all over the room, my body and the universe. I felt as if I had begun to self-obliterate, to revolve in the infinity of endless time and the absoluteness of space, and be reduced to nothingness. As I realized it was actually happening and not just in my imagination, I was frightened. I knew I had to run away lest I should be deprived of my life by the spell of the red flowers. I ran desperately up the stairs. The steps below me began to fall apart and I fell down the stairs straining my ankle.[citation needed]
Another quote of hers:
“…a polka-dot has the form of the sun, which is a symbol of the energy of the whole world and our living life, and also the form of the moon, which is calm. Round, soft, colorful, senseless and unknowing. Polka-dots become movement… Polka dots are a way to infinity.”[26]
Her organically abstract paintings of one or two colors (the Infinity Nets series), which she began upon arriving in New York, garnered comparisons to the work of Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Barnett Newman. When she left New York she was practically forgotten as an artist until the late 1980s and 1990s, when a number of retrospectives revived international interest.[27] Following the success of the Japanese pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1993 – a dazzling mirrored room filled with small pumpkin sculptures in which she resided in color-coordinated magician’s attire – Kusama went on to produce a huge, yellow pumpkin sculpture covered with an optical pattern of black spots. The pumpkin came to represent for her a kind of alter-ego or self-portrait.[28] Kusama’s later installation I’m Here, but Nothing, (2000–2008) is a simply furnished room consisting of table and chairs, place settings and bottles, armchairs and rugs, however its walls are tattooed with hundreds of fluorescent polka dots glowing in the UV light. The result is an endless infinite space where the self and everything in the room is obliterated.[29] The multi-part floating work Guidepost to the New Space, a series of rounded “humps” in fire-engine red with white polka dots, was displayed in Pandanus Lake.
[edit]Works

[edit]Writing
In 1977, Kusama published a book of poems and paintings entitled 7. One year later, her first novel Manhattan Suicide Addict appeared. Between 1983 and 1990, she finished the novels The Hustler’s Grotto of Christopher Street (1983), The Burning of St Mark’s Church (1985), Between Heaven and Earth (1988), Woodstock Phallus Cutter (1988), Aching Chandelier (1989), Double Suicide at Sakuragazuka (1989), and Angels in Cape Cod (1990), alongside several issues of the magazine S&M Sniper in collaboration with photographer Nobuyoshi Araki.[30]
[edit]Film
In 1968, the film “Kusama’s Self-Obliteration” which Kusama produced and starred in won a prize at the Fourth International Experimental Film Competition in Belgium and the Second Maryland Film Festival and the second prize at the Ann Arbor Film Festival. In 1991, Kusama starred in the film Tokyo Decadence, written and directed by Ryu Murakami, and in 1993, she collaborated with British musician Peter Gabriel on an installation in Yokohama.[31]

Red Pumpkin (2006), Naoshima
[edit]Fashion
In 1968, Kusama established Kusama Fashion Company Ltd., and began selling avantgarde fashion in the “Kusama Corner” at Bloomingdales.[32] In 2009, Kusama designed a handbag-shaped cell phone called C-top, and My Doggie Ring-Ring, an accompanying dog-shaped holder, for a limited edition of Japan’s mobile communication giant KDDI Corporation’s “iida“ brand.[33] In 2011, Kusama created artwork for six limited-edition lipglosses from Lancôme.[34] That same year, she worked with Marc Jacobs (who visited her studio in Japan in 2006) on a line of Louis Vuitton products, including leather goods, ready-to-wear, accessories, shoes, watches, and jewelry.[35]
[edit]Commissions

Narcissus Garden (2009), Instituto Inhotim
To date, Kusama has completed several major outdoor sculptural commissions, mostly in the form of brightly hued monstrous plants and flowers, for public and private institutions including Pumpkin (1994) for the Fukuoka Municipal Museum of Art; The Visionary Flowers (2002) for the Matsumoto City Museum of Art; Tsumari in Bloom (2003) for Matsudai Station, Niigata; Tulipes de Shangri-La (2003) for Euralille in Lille, France; Pumpkin (2006) at Bunka-mura on Benesse Island of Naoshima; Hello, Anyang with Love (2007) for Pyeonghwa Park, Anyang; and The Hymn of Life: Tulips (2007) for the Beverly Gardens Park in Los Angeles.[36] In 1998, she realized a mural for the hallway of the Gare do Oriente subway station in Lisbon. Alongside these monumental works, she has produced smaller scale outdoor pieces including Key-Chan and Ryu-Chan, a pair of dotted dogs. All the outdoor works are cast in highly durable fiberglass-reinforced plastic, then painted in urethane to glossy perfection.[37]
In 2010, Kusama designed a Town Sneaker-model bus, which she titled Mizutama Ranbu (Wild Polka Dot Dance) and whose route travels through her home town of Matsumoto.[38] In 2011, she was commissioned to design the front cover of millions of pocket London Underground maps; the result is entitled Polka Dots Festival in London (2011). Coinciding with an exhibition of the artist’s work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2012, a 120-foot reproduction of Kusama’s painting Yellow Trees (1994) covered a condominium building under construction in New York’s Meatpacking District.[39] That same year, Kusama conceived her floor installation Thousands of Eyes as a commission for the new Queen Elizabeth II Courts of Law, Brisbane.[40]
[edit]Exhibitions

Repetitive Vision (1996) installation at Mattress Factory Art Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
In 1959, Kusama had her first solo exhibition in New York at the Brata Gallery, an artist’s co-op. She showed a series of white net paintings which were enthusiastically reviewed by Donald Judd (both Judd and Frank Stella then acquired paintings from the show).[41] Kusama has since exhibited work with, among others, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, and Jasper Johns. Exhibiting alongside European artists including Lucio Fontana, Pol Bury, Otto Piene, and Gunther Uecker, in 1962 she was the only female artist to take part in the widely acclaimed ‘Nul’ (Zero) international group exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.[42] She represented Japan at the Venice Biennale in 1993, and in 1998–1999 a major retrospective exhibition of her work toured the U.S. and Japan. Major exhibitions of her work include Kitakyushu Municipal Museum of Art, Fukuoka, Japan (1987); Center for International Contemporary Arts, New York (1989); “Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama,1958–1969”, LACMA, 1998 (traveling to Museum of Modern Art, New York, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo), 1998–99; Le Consortium, Dijon, 2000 (traveled to Maison de la Culture du Japon, Paris; Kunsthallen Brandts, Odense, Denmark; Les Abattoirs, Toulouse; Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna; and Artsonje Center, Seoul, 2001–2003); “KUSAMATRIX”, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, 2004 (traveling to Art Park Museum of Contemporary Art, Sapporo Art Park, Hokkaido); “Eternity – Modernity”, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (touring Japan), 2004–2005; and “The Mirrored Years”, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, 2008 (traveling to Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand, 2009). In August 2010, Kusama exhibited at the Aichi Triennale 2010 [1], Nagoya. Her works are exhibited inside the Aichi Arts Center, out of the center and Toyota car polka dot project. As of July 2011, several of Kusama’s most intimate works are on display at the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid, Spain.
As part of FINA Festival 2007, Kusama created Guidepost to the New Space, a vibrant outdoor installation for Birrarung Marr beside the Yarra River in Melbourne. In 2009, the Guideposts were re-installed at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, this time displayed as floating “humps” on a lake.[43]
An exhibition of Kusama’a work opened at the Tate Modern in London on February 9, 2012.[44] Described as ‘akin to being suspended in a beautiful cosmos gazing at infinite worlds, or like a tiny dot of fluoresecent plankton in an ocean of glowing microscopic life’,[45] the exhibition features work from Kusama’s entire career.
[edit]Collections

Kusama’s work is in the collections of leading museums throughout the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Tate Modern, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.
[edit]Recognition

Yayoi Kusama’s retrospective exhibition at Tate Modern, London in early 2012.
Kusama has received numerous awards, including the Asahi Prize (2001); Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (2003); and the National Lifetime Achievement Awards, the Order of the Rising Sun (2006). In October 2006, Yayoi Kusama became the first Japanese woman to receive the Praemium Imperiale, one of Japan’s most prestigious prizes for internationally recognized artists.[46]
[edit]Art market

Kusama’s work has performed strongly at auction: top prices for her work are for paintings from the late 1950s and early 1960s. As of 2012, her work has the highest turnover of any living woman artist.[47] In November 2008, Christie’s New York sold a 1959 white “Infinity Net” painting formerly owned by Donald Judd,[48] No. 2, for $5.1 million, then a record for a living female artist.[49] In comparison, the highest price for a sculpture from her New York years is £72,500 ($147,687), fetched by the 1965 wool, pasta, paint and hanger assemblage Golden Macaroni Jacket at Sotheby’s London in October 2007. A 2006 acrylic on fiberglass-reinforced plastic pumpkin earned $264,000, the top price for one of her sculptures, also at Sotheby’s in 2007[50]
In the 1960s, Beatrice Perry’s Gres Gallery played an important role in establishing Kusama’s career in the United States. Ota Fine Arts, Kusama’s longtime Tokyo dealer, has worked with the artist since the 1980s.[51] Since 2007, Kusama is also represented by Gagosian Gallery and Victoria Miro Gallery; before moving to Gagosian, she had been with Robert Miller Gallery, New York.[52]
[edit]In popular culture

Superchunk, an American indie band, included a song called “Art Class (Song for Yayoi Kusama)” on its Here’s to Shutting Up album.
Yoko Ono cites Kusama as an influence.
The recently built Matsumoto Performing Art Center in her hometown Matsumoto, designed by Toyo Ito, has an entirely dotted façade, likely influenced by her works.[original research?]
She is mentioned in the lyrics of the Le Tigre song Hot Topic.
[edit]Bibliography

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Net: The Autobiogrphy of Yayoi Kusama, 2011, English, Translated by Ralph McCarthy, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A., ISBN 978-0-226-46498-5.
Jo Applin, “Resisting Infinity”, Yayoi Kusama, exch. cat., Victoria Miro Gallery, London, 2008
Izumi Nakajima, “Yayoi Kusama between Abstraction and Pathology”. In: Griselda Pollock (ed.), Psychoanalysis and the Image. London: Routledge, 2006.
“Collection of Print Works: Yayoi Kusama, 1974–2004”, Japanese/English, Abe Corporation, Tokyo Japan.
“Eternity-Modernity: Yayoi Kusama”, 2005, English/Japanese, Bijutsu Shuppan-sha Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
“Manhattan Suicide Addict: Yayoi Kusama”, 2005, French, Les Presses du Reel, Dijon, France.
“Kusamatrix”, 2004, English/Japanese, Kadokawa Shoten, Tokyo.
“Yayoi Kusama Furniture by graf: decorative mode no.3”, 2003, Seigensha Art Publishing, Inc, Kyoto, Japan.
“Yayoi Kusama”, 2003, German, Kunsthalle wien, Vienna, Austria.
“Infinity Nets”, 2002, Japanese, Sakuhinsha, Tokyo, Japan.
“Yayoi Kusama”, 2001, French, Les Press du Reel Janvier, Dijon, France.
“Yayoi Kusama”, 2000, English, Phaidon Press Ltd, London, UK.
“Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958–1968”, Los Angeles County Museum of Art 1998, Lynn Zelevansky, Laura Hoptman, Yayoi Kusama
“Violet Obsession”, 1998, English, Wandering Mind Books, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
“Hustlers Grotto”, 1998, English, Wandering Mind Books, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
J. F. Rodenbeck, “Yayoi Kusama: Surface, Stitch, Skin”. In: Catherine de Zegher (ed.), Inside the Visible. The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston & MIT Press, 1996.
“Yayoi Kusama Print Works”, 1992, Abe Corporation, Tokyo, Japan.
“Yayoi Kusama: Driving Image”, 1986, Parco shuppan, Tokyo, Japan.
“A Book of Poems and Paintings”, 1977, Japan Edition Art, Tokyo, Japan.
Judy B. Cutler, “Narcissus, Narcosis, Neurosis: The Visions of Yayoi Kusama”. In: Hirsh, Jennie, and Wallace, Isabelle D., eds. Contemporary Art and Classical Myth. Farnham: Ashgate, 2011 — with Yayoi Kusama at Louis Vuitton NA.

pocket funk, louisville kentucky, organ jazz, jon hammond, yayoi kusama, loui vuitton, 9 west 57th street, La Vieille Russie, Radio TV Show

HammondCast 15 and Jon Hammond Journal August 15, 2012

August 15, 2012

*LISTEN TO THE AUDIO HERE: HammondCast 15

Downloaded 1,109 times

http://archive.org/details/HammondCast_15

HammondCast 15 for KYOU Radio, this show just before Jon blasts over to Hamburg Germany to record a new album at NDR Radio. Special guest recordings of Jon with radio legend Al Jazzbeaux Collins telling the story of Jon’s composition “Train Song” and with Chuy Varela talking about the meaning of Jon’s song “Get Back In The Groove” played 2 different ways: from “Hammond’s Bolero” CD 2003 release (instrumental) and a 1981 version from DTI Records label with Frank Biner on vocals and Jon covering all the instruments + Dave Danza on the drums. Last song: “Czechoslovakian Salsa Song”-JON HAMMOND Trio.
HammondCast is the music of Organist/Accordionist Jon Hammond *Member American Federation of Musicians Union Local 802/Local 6/ASCAP Publishing-JON HAMMOND International, Inc. “The FINGERS…are the SINGERS!”
http://www.HammondCast.com
Music, Travel & “Soft-News”

Jon Hammond with Jesse Chuy Varela in studio of KCSM 91.1 FM in San Mateo California

New York NY — Local 802 Rehearsal Room – smokin’ drummer Michael Pratt on the Pratt Brothers Big Band today – check this band out folks! Jon Hammond
*visit their website:
http://jazzcomposersservice.com/?page_id=48 — with Michael Pratt at Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM

Since its formation in 1980, The Pratt Brothers Big Band has backed such musical artists as Fran Warren, Zoot Sims, Al Grey and Roy Eldridge. They have also performed a tribute to the great arranger, Fletcher Henderson, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

More and more radio stations are once again playing the music of the Swing Era. Co-bandleader, Dean Pratt has waited all his life for this golden opportunity. Along with fellow leader, Michael Pratt, Dean’s brother, this 16-piece band features the best musicians New York has to offer. Many are former sidemen of the Harry James, Maynard Ferguson, Woody Herman, Gerry Mulligan and Buddy Rich bands, and are currently featured on Broadway and in the New York studios.
The band plays music from the libraries of Harry James, Count Basie, Buddy Rich, and Woody Herman, but also many pieces of original music written and arranged for the PBBB.

No other big band today captures so authentically the spirit and drive that made the best bands of the Swing Era so compelling, and no band possesses such a remarkably deep and diverse book, comprising charts by such classic Big Band arrangers as Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Jimmy Mundy, Neal Hefti and Ernie Wilkins to more progressive arrangers such as Bob Brookmeyer, Bill Holman, Thad Jones, Francy Boland, Don Piestrup and Mike Abene—music to dance to, as well as music to listen to, no matter what the occasion. cont.. — with Michael Pratt at Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM.

New York NY — Local 802 Rehearsal Hall – Gary Morgan’s PanAmericana!
Incredible Band and Music! – Jon Hammond

http://www.panamericanajazz.com/bio.php
Gary Morgan and PanAmericana! Bios:

Gary Morgan was born in Santiago, Chile, but moved to Toronto, Canada at the age of 2. Tuned to music from an early age, he digested the popular music of the day, country music, Top 40, blues, big bands, rock & roll and rhythm & blues. Formative events in his early life included hearing the bands of Lionel Hampton, Count Basie and Illinois Jaquet up close, “these guys were really having fun!”, and hearing Salsa for the first time, booming from a record shop in the Times Square subway station, on a Christmas visit to New York with his parents.

Another memorable experience from his early teens was attending the fabled Jazz at Massey Hall concert of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie et al. Memorable because he couldn’t stand the music — “too many notes” for his tender ears, and he lost his part time grocery job for deserting his fellow workers.

He started instrumental music in high school, wanted the drums, but was persuaded to take up the saxophone instead by his teacher. After a mediocre academic career, he settled down to practicing and freelanced in Toronto for 15 years, playing saxophone and woodwinds on TV variety shows, recordings, movie soundtracks, jingles and musical theater.

During this period Gary appeared with various musical artists including Tony Bennett, Ella Fitzgerald, Nancy Wilson, Dionne Warwick, Otis Redding, Gladys Knight, (Little) Stevie Wonder, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Herman, Jose Feliciano, Quincy Jones, Lionel Hampton, Oscar Peterson, Ray Charles, Rob McConnell, Buddy Rich, Benny Goodman and Henry Mancini.

Gary also studied theory, harmony and composition privately, as well as electronic music. He began composing and arranging music for various ensembles he was performing with, and leading his own small jazz groups. Signature memories from that era included his first trips to Cuba and Brazil. Brazil, in particular, has been a dominant influence on Gary’s music:
“From the moment I first stepped off the plane, I was seduced by the warmth and poetry of the culture and the people. In musical terms, the great variety of rhythmic traditions, which are part of the DNA of every Brazilian, the harmonic subtlety of the popular and art music, but most importantly the rich melodic tradition of choro, going back 100 years or more, adds a dimension that seems lacking in our popular music in America.”

In 1980, sensing a need for change, Gary received a Canada Council grant to study jazz composition at the Berklee School of Music in Boston, studying with the legendary Herb Pomeroy, among others. After a productive year, he packed his bags and migrated to New York, whereupon he switched to the bass, to better experience the perspective of the rhythm section.

In 1989, Gary was invited to join the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop under the guidance of Bob Brookmeyer and Manny Albam, and later Jim McNeely, where he gained more expertise writing for large ensembles, met other similarly inclined composers and acquired practical experience in the logistics of organizing and promoting concerts.

Gary has been the recipient of composition grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and is a member of the American Federation of Musicians, Local 802.

PanAmericana! began in New York in 1997 as a compositional vehicle for Gary, as well as a repertory orchestra for modern Cuban and Brazilian classics. The recent emphasis in the band has been the orchestration and arrangement of some of the wealth of material emerging from the contemporary composers of Brazil, who do not have much exposure in this country, including such major talents as Egberto Gismonti, Milton Nascimento, Hermeto Pascoal, Jovino Santos Neto and Itibere Zwarg. This is not your father’s big band. Although Gary is steeped in the big band tradition and sound, PanAmericana! represents an attempt to expand, through orchestration, his rhythmic, melodic and harmonic ideas.

PanAmericana! is based in New York City, and plays a variety of venues in the New York and New Jersey area including Birdland, Makor, Nuyorican Poets Cafe, the Garage, Trumpets Jazz Club, the Baha’i Center, as well as concerts in Central Park, Brooklyn Museum. The personnel includes many of the finest New York area latin jazz musicians.

In 2004, Gary formed an all-star Canadian orchestra, which is based in Toronto, and is available for dates in Eastern Canada. — with Norbert Stachel at Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Jane Dornacker Excerpt From Jon Hammond Show

http://archive.org/details/JonHammondJaneDornacker-Broadcaster_Comedienne_Composerhereinperformance/

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpIHRNe45mA

R.I.P. Jane Dornacker, Jane died tragically in the NBC Helicopter on October 22, 1986 while on-air with Joey Reynolds on WNBC. I shot this with Jane less than a month before on Sept. 27th ’86, she was a huge talent and good person greatly missed! Jon Hammond
*excerpt from my cable tv show – The Jon Hammond Show
http://www.HammondCast.com
Jane’s Wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Dornacker
Category:
People & Blogs
Tags:
Jane Dornacker, Tubes, WNBC, Leila And The Snakes, Jon Hammond Show, Joey Reynolds

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/jane-dornacker-broadcaster-comedienne-composer-here-in-performance-6302840

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOA2VwA?p=1 width=”640″ height=”390″]

Vimeo http://vimeo.com/47444988

Jane Dornacker – Broadcaster, Comedienne, Composer here in performance from Jon Hammond on Vimeo.

New York NY — R.I.P. Jane Dornacker, Jane died tragically in the NBC Helicopter on October 22, 1986 while on-air with Joey Reynolds.
Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpIHRNe45mA
I shot this with Jane less than a month before on Sept. 27th ’86, she was a huge talent and good person greatly missed! Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Dornacker

Jane Dornacker (October 1, 1947 – October 22, 1986) was an American rock musician, actress, and comedienne turned traffic reporter.
In 1986, while working for WNBC 660 AM Radio in New York City (which became WFAN in 1988), Dornacker was aboard during two unrelated crashes of the helicopters leased to WNBC. She survived the first crash, but was killed in the second crash into the Hudson River, which occurred as she was in the middle of a live traffic report. Her death came shortly after that of her husband, Bob Knickerbocker, orphaning their 16-year-old daughter. The NTSB investigation determined the cause of the fatal crash to have been use of improper parts and poor maintenance on the part of Spectrum Helicopters of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey.

Music and acting
Dornacker was the tall lead singer (Leila), keyboardist, and songwriter of the 1970s/1980s San Francisco “tack” rock group Leila and the Snakes. Pearl Gates and Pamela Wood provided supporting vocals. Their repertoire included “Rock and Roll Weirdos,” “Pyramid Power” and a spoof version of Peggy Lee’s “Is That All There Is?” Gates later left (and took the band with her) to form Pearl Harbor and the Explosions. Guitarist Miles Corbin went on to form the surf instrumental band the Aqua Velvets.
Dornacker provided lead vocals on “Christopher Columbus” (1978), a song by R. Crumb & His Cheap Suit Serenaders. With Ron Nagle, she co-wrote the humorous hit song “Don’t Touch Me There” for The Tubes. The song was sung by Re Styles and appeared on The Tubes’ second studio album, Young and Rich (1976), and was released as a 7″ single in the US, the UK, and Holland. The B-side was “Proud to Be an American”. Jane had also toured with The Tubes as a backing singer and dancer.
Dornacker was also an actress. She appeared in playwright Sam Shepard’s jazz opera Inacoma at San Francisco’s Magic Theatre (1977) and was featured in other works by the Overtone Theatre. She appeared in The Stand-Up, Anita Sperm and as the mysterious Nurse Murch in the film The Right Stuff.
[edit]Stand up comedy and radio
Dornacker developed a successful career as a stand-up comic on the San Francisco circuit and did her first work as a traffic reporter in the early-mid-1980s for KFRC, a popular Top 40 radio station. She worked with Don Rose, who was that station’s morning disc jockey at the time. She was noted for her exceptionally fast speech, so fast it required concentration to understand her. As she did traffic, she would tell her daughter Naomi to get up and get to school. She moved to New York City to become a much-loved, raspy-voiced “trafficologist” and “Jane-in-a-plane.” After Dornacker died, Rose arranged several tributes to establish a college fund for Naomi.
Dornacker survived one helicopter crash only to die in a second helicopter crash in the same year. On April 18, 1986, Dornacker was reporting from a WNBC helicopter over the Hackensack River in New Jersey when the aircraft crashed into the river. She and the pilot survived and were able to swim to shore.
[edit]Death

On October 22, 1986, at 4:44 PM, while Dornacker was giving one of the station’s N-Copter traffic reports during the Joey Reynolds Show on WNBC Radio in New York City, the Enstrom F-28 helicopter she was reporting from plunged into the Hudson River from an altitude of roughly 75 feet. On her final radio broadcast she was giving a report of an accident involving a tractor-trailer and a car as well as a car fire. She also stated that the outbound Holland Tunnel was heavy with traffic and that the Lincoln Tunnel was much better with traffic and a car fire. Dornacker was starting her report for incoming New Jersey traffic when the helicopter suffered mechanical failure in mid broadcast and crashed. Her last words were “Hit the water, hit the water, hit the water!”
The F-28 helicopter nose-dived, struck the top of a chain link fence at a river pier, crashed into the Hudson River very near to the Manhattan shore and sank in 15 to 20 feet of water. Both occupants were trapped for nearly 10–15 minutes before help arrived. Dornacker died on her way to Saint Vincent’s Hospital. She was 39 years old. Her pilot and the only other occupant, Bill Pate, was severely injured but survived.
In the subsequent investigation, the NTSB found that the sprag clutch that was installed in the helicopter, which was on lease to WNBC Radio by Spectrum Helicopters of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, was a military surplus part which was not designed for use in a civilian aircraft, and that the part had not been adequately lubricated. It directly led to a mid-air seizure of the main rotor blades. The staff of WNBC were so appalled at the revelation of this malpractice at Spectrum Helicopters that at one point they threatened to resign en masse.[citation needed]
[edit]Final crash transcript
Aircheck of the incident
“ Joey Reynolds: “Okay, here’s Jane Dornacker now in the N-Copter”
(NBC chimes)
Dornacker: “Thank you very much, Joey. There was indeed an accident southbound on the Major Deegan at the Mosholu Parkway, an accident, a serious accident involving a tractor trailer and a car. It has been pushed off to the shoulder, but now watch out there now, because another flatbed truck is going to have to come to clear it, so yield right-of-way. Northbound on the BQE, we’ve spotted that disabled vehicle in the right-hand lane before the Kosciuszko, not causing much of a backup, but further northbound there on the BQE, traffic is very heavy, past the Kosciuszko all the way over to the LIE. The outbound Holland Tunnel extra-heavy for you right now; earlier there was a car fire at Hudson and Canal Street. It has been cleared out, except heading to New Jersey, the outbound Lincoln Tunnel looks a lot better for you. In New Jersey…
(helicopter engine overspeed)
Hit the water! Hit the water! Hit the water!
(Brief static followed by five seconds of dead air)
Reynolds: Okay, we’re gonna play some, uh, some music here I think. Find out what’s going on with the helicopter. Something happened there. It’s, uh, quarter of 5; 16 ’til 5 on WNBC, on the Joey Reynolds show. We’re taking an N-Copter report from Jane Dornacker; let’s check in and see how they’re doing there, and then we’ll come right back at you.
(Hip to Be Square plays)
Reynolds: I hope nothing happened with Jane. We had, uh, a helicopter report, from the N-Copter. Of course, you know, once before, we had this happen. A few months ago, she went down in the, uh, in the drink. Not she, I mean, she has a… pilot. Jane is, uh…
Other voice: Well, until we find out what’s going on, we’ll just…
Reynolds: Jane was up there just now giving us a report, and sometimes it just gets cut off, too, you know. It’s just an electronic thing. But, uh, this time she said, uh, “hit the water,” or something like that. So we’re going to find out what’s going on there, so stay tuned. We hope nothing… say a little prayer, hope nothing’s, nothing’s wrong. That’s really a… (deep breath) that’s a hard, hard job.

[edit]Aftermath

Dornacker’s then 16-year-old daughter, Naomi, received $325,000 in a settlement with owner Spectrum Helicopters of Ridgefield Park, NJ, and the maker of the helicopter. Naomi’s father Bob Knickerbocker died shortly before her mother’s death.
All the New York stations grounded their traffic helicopters for a few days after that accident.
A memorial concert in celebration of Jane took place at the Warfield Theatre in San Francisco on Saturday, November 22, 1986.
There is a memorial to her in Wayne, New Jersey, where Dornacker and her family lived.
Shortly after the incident several on-air interviews with WNBC Radio staff describe the incident and their feelings in detail, including how other news organizations “pumped news” into the WNBC Radio newsroom as they were all in shock. Joey Reynolds broke down on-air when talking about her now orphaned child. WNBC played other interviews with friends and recordings of her talking about the first helicopter crash earlier that same year. Her music was also played during these tribute shows including “Don’t Touch Me There” which she wrote for The Tubes. —

New York NY — Local 802 – R.I.P. Wade Barnes, passed away at only 57, never complained…very nice swingin’ cat! Jon Hammond

*seen here in picture I took with Mike Camoia tenor and Bob Cunningham bass at Local 802 Monday Night Jazz Session
Drummer, Educator Wade Barnes Dies at 57
http://jazztimes.com/articles/29681-drummer-educator-wade-barnes-dies-at-57
By Jeff Tamarkin
Wade Barnes, a drummer, composer, producer, bandleader, arranger, educator and executive, passed away March 3 a age 57. The cause and place of death were not reported. Barnes was founder of the Brooklyn Four Plus One, Inc., a nonprofit whose stated mission, according to the organization’s website, is “to bring the highest quality of America’s classical music [jazz] to all ages, races, ethnic groups and socioeconomic levels.”

Originally, the site states, the Brooklyn Four Plus One, Inc. “was a band organized by drummer and educator Wade Barnes in the mid 1990s. The band was comprised of native Brooklynites deeply rooted in America’s musical culture. The ensemble conducted performances, clinics and symposia for a variety of audiences.” The group was later renamed the Brooklyn Repertory Ensemble (B.R.E.) and is now comprised of 17 members and plays for schools and arts organizations, particularly in under-served communities.

Barnes, who received multiple music degrees from colleges and universities, is credited, according to his official biography, with “facilitating a holistic conception which incorporates the entire history of American music.” He led Wade Barnes and the Bottom Line (a 10-member ensemble) and Wade Barnes and Unit Structures. During his career he also performed with “Doc” Cheatham, Earle Warren, Dicky Wells, Howard McGhee; Jimmy Garrison, Bob Cranshaw, Archie Shepp, Sonny Fortune; Jon Faddis and others. In addition, Barnes created clinics, workshops and curricula for the New York City Public Schools.

Barnes appeared on numerous recordings with several ensembles. — with Bob Cunningham at Associated Musicians of Greater New York, Local 802 AFM

The Latest Prank From TSA Airport Inspectors — Ha Hah Ha, very funny!
I traveled yesterday with my instrument in a very special case made by Gator company that has the latest TSA approved lock which I do not use, I never lock my cases ever since 9/11. Often the TSA people do not close the latches properly – 4 latches on the case, I get it back from a flight and 1, 2, or even 3 have not been latched properly, so I have taken to putting green gaffers tape over the latches and I put a very friendly respectful letter inside the case to the TSA to ask them kindly to be careful to close the latches properly. Last night I got home with my case, the TSA Agent decided to lock the case up with his TSA Key, I am not carrying the key since I routinely do not lock the case. No other key will work and I have a lot of keys –

New York NY — God bless the B&H people for letting me use one of their TSA keys to unlock my flight case that the smart-aleck TSA agent locked up when he inspected it, so I didn’t have to break it open. Thank you B&H…B&H Photo Rules! Jon Hammond — at B&H Photo Video Pro Audio http://www.bhphotovideo.com

New York NY — It’s a little bit blurry the image, but here is the National Panasonic tube table radio that I hand-carried from California to my friend Mike’s Cupcake Cafe on Ninth Avenue NYC, now installed and rockin’ the cafe!
My girlfriend wrapped it good with bubble-wrap and TLC, it made the trip fine – Vintage National Panasonic RE-784A AM FM Tube Radio – this radio is from the California Historical Radio Society / CHRS. Mike is an avid radio listener, I’m sure he’ll have “The Blues Hour” from WBGO 88.3 FM blaring over it at 3PM tomorrow and I’ll drop in for a cup of coffee and enjoy the sound and good strong coffee! Next stop after: Local 802 Monday Night Jazz Session – Jon Hammond — at Cupcake Cafe http://www.cupcakecafe-nyc.com
545 9th Avenue (btw 40th & 41st Street)

New York NY — Aston Martin coupe parked out in front of Uncle Jack’s Steakhouse sighted on Ninth Avenue – Jon Hammond
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aston_Martin_Rapide

19 Broadway – Jon Hammond Band
Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-7_DphmfV0
10,005

*WATCH THE VIDEO HERE: Agora Stage Jam Of The Year

http://archive.org/details/LegendaryJamOfTheYearBand2012MusikmesseAgoraStage

Legendary Jam Of The Year Band 2012 Musikmesse Agora Stage

Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxS2lkIjFQQ

Led by Guitarist Musical Director Tommy Denander – Legendary Jam Of The Year Band jamming on a Jimi Hendrix tune Little Wing on the Agora Stage.
Chuck Plaisance sings this one with Jekko S. on bass, Jimmy Kresic keys, Pi TTi Hecht percussion, Jon Hammond Sk1 Hammond organ, Ricky Lawson drums, Sky Dangcil harpejji – Bobby Kimball seen at beginning announcing, just sang song before – http://www.HammondCast.com

Blip TV http://blip.tv/jon-hammond/legendary-jam-of-the-year-band-2012-musikmesse-agora-stage-6299337

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYOAvi0A?p=1 width=”640″ height=”390″]

Vimeo http://vimeo.com/47311151

San Lorenzo California — Lydia Pense of Cold Blood interview with Jon Hammond on HammondCast

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-561051 — with Lydia Pense at Starbucks San Lorenzo

owner “Jack” cruising in the 1955 T-Bird – Jon Hammond
(Jack owns series 1955, 1956 and 1957 T-Birds) very cool! JH

Jane Dornacker, NBC, Helicopter crash, Gary Morgan Panamericana, Pratt Brothers Big Band, Associated Musicians of Greater New York, HammondCast, Local 802, Jon Hammond